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Second day of deliberations ends with no verdict in murder trial of Baltimore man accused in shooting spree

A second day of deliberations concluded Wednesday with jurors undecided in the murder trial of Mausean Carter, the Northwest Baltimore man accused of a vigilante war on drug dealers.

Baltimore Circuit Judge Robert Taylor Jr. ordered the jury to return Thursday and continue deliberations. The jurors had sent questions to the judge about Carter’s mental state and his possible prison term. These matters, however, are not up to the jury.

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If Carter is convicted, a second proceeding will determine his mental state. And judges hand down prison sentences — not jurors.

Carter, 31, is accused of carrying out a series of drive-by shootings in December 2017 aimed at drug dealers in West Baltimore. He had become fed up with the drug dealers cat-calling his girlfriend, hassling him and sitting on the used cars he bought and sold from his home, police and prosecutors say.

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Mausean Carter took matters into his own hands when some neighborhood men were hassling his girlfriend, a Baltimore homicide detective testified Thursday. Carter, 31, is standing trial in Baltimore Circuit Court for a spate of shootings in December 2017, including the killing of Martrell Harris.

Carter allegedly armed himself with a high-powered assault rifle then set out. In three days of shooting, two men were killed and several others wounded. Prosecutors say some victims were innocent bystanders struck and killed by stray gunfire.

Then he drew widespread attention for leading police on a high-speed chase through the city before his arrest. In a recorded interview with police, Carter admitted to carrying out his personal “war on drugs.”

Members of his family say he suffered delusions and mental illness. They tried to have him committed only to be turned away. Carter passed a psychological evaluation to stand trial.

He faces life in prison if convicted. A second proceeding would determine whether he serves his time in a prison or hospital.

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