xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

More motions hearings scheduled in Freddie Gray case next week

Officers charged in Freddie Gray case are, top row from left, Caeser R. Goodson Jr., Sgt. Alicia White, Officer Garrett E. Miller.; bottom row from left, Lt. Brian W. Rice, Officer William G. Porter and Officer Edward M. Nero.
Officers charged in Freddie Gray case are, top row from left, Caeser R. Goodson Jr., Sgt. Alicia White, Officer Garrett E. Miller.; bottom row from left, Lt. Brian W. Rice, Officer William G. Porter and Officer Edward M. Nero. (Baltimore Police / Baltimore Sun)

Prosecutors and defense attorneys will return to court next week in the cases of six Baltimore police officers charged in the arrest and death of Freddie Gray, according to a judge's order.

Judge Barry Williams scheduled motions hearings at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday in Baltimore Circuit Court to address motions filed in all of the officers' cases. His order did not specify which motions would be discussed.

Advertisement

The hearings will be the fourth and fifth times attorneys in the case will appear before Williams in open court.

The first two hearings dealt with defense motions to dismiss the case, to recuse Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn J. Mosby and her office, and to remove the trials of the officers from Baltimore — all of which were denied by Williams. Williams also denied a state motion to try the officers together.

Advertisement

The third hearing — attended by five of the six officers — set the dates for the officers' trials.

Officer William G. Porter — the only officer who did not attend the last hearing — is scheduled to be tried first, starting Nov. 30. The five other officers' trials are scheduled from January through March.

Gray, 25, suffered a severe spinal cord injury while in police custody in April. His death a week later sparked protests against police brutality, and his funeral was followed by rioting, looting and arson. Mosby charged the six officers days later with a range of crimes.

Officer Caesar R. Goodson Jr., the driver of the police van in which Gray was injured, is charged with second-degree depraved-heart murder. Sgt. Alicia D. White, Lt. Brian W. Rice and Porter are charged with manslaughter. Officers Edward M. Nero and Garrett E. Miller face lesser charges, including second-degree assault. All six have been charged with misconduct in office. All have pleaded not guilty to all counts.

There are important motions that must be resolved before the officers' trials.

Williams, for example, must rule on defense motions to suppress statements that five officers provided to police investigators, on the grounds they were improperly obtained because the officers were not informed of their rights. Goodson did not provide a statement.

The statements will likely play a central role in the officers' trials if allowed as evidence. Prosecutors, for example, have called Porter a "material witness" in the trials of two other officers, in part because of what he said to investigators about those officers' actions during Gray's arrest and transport.

Protests have been staged outside Circuit Court during previous hearings in the case, and at least three people have been arrested. The city spent $450,000 on police coverage during two days of largely peaceful pretrial hearings last month.

Williams issued his scheduling order for next week's hearings last week, but it was not made available until Wednesday.

twitter.com/rectorsun

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement