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Baltimore dirt bike 'godfather' Wheelie Wayne agrees to community service in 'chop shop' case

Columnist Dan Rodricks talks to "Wheelie Wayne" Davis about the need for a dirt bike park in Baltimore. (Emma Patti Harris/Baltimore Sun video)

A man dubbed the "godfather of the 12 O'Clock Boys" who police said was maintaining a "chop shop" agreed Monday to serve 48 hours of community service.

Dawayne Davis, known as "Wheelie Wayne," was charged earlier this year with 15 counts, including theft scheme and removing or obliterating serial numbers on dirt bike engines. After he agreed to the community service, his case was placed on the stet, or inactive, docket.

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Davis' attorney, Michael Tomko, said "the resolution of the case ensures that Mr. Davis can give back to the city that he loves," and declined to comment further.

Davis, 40, who appeared in court in jeans and a green button-down shirt, did not speak and kept his arms behind his back.

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He declined to comment after the hearing.

A spokeswoman for the state's attorney's office said it "was not involved in the investigation of this matter prior to the defendant's arrest. Upon review of the evidence, including but not limited to the search and seizure warrant as well as pre-trial motions filed by the defense, it was determined that a STET with community service would be an appropriate resolution to this matter."

As part of the agreement, Davis also forfeited claims to any of the items police took during a search of his Southwest Baltimore home.

Baltimore Police charge dirt bike legend "Wheelie Wayne" with maintaining "chop shop"

Davis was arrested in February after a raid last year at his home, where police said in charging documents that they found a dirt bike with a stolen engine and a stolen four-wheeler, as well as other engines from bikes that had been reported stolen. Others had obliterated serial numbers, according to the documents.

Davis previously said in an interview with The Baltimore Sun's Dan Rodricks that he had titles to all but one of the vehicles, and they were properly registered and stored in compliance with city law.

Dirt-bike riding in Baltimore is illegal. In recent years, police have fought to curb illegal riding on city streets, which they say is dangerous to the riders and others.

Davis is one of the city's best-known dirt-bike riders and has lobbied for the city to build a dirt-bike park in the city.

But Baltimore police say a dirt bike task force they started last summer is beginning to make a dent in the number of people riding dirt bikes. The pastime is illegal in Baltimore yet attracts riders who perform stunts and ride in traffic, often without helmets.

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