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Baltimore Police release body-worn camera footage from fatal shooting by officers near Power Plant Live

A 35-year-old man was shot and killed by Baltimore Police officers last month after he drew a gun but did not fire during a confrontation with the officers, body-worn camera footage released Thursday shows.

The gunman, Benjamin Tyson, did not fire upon the officers because his gun had jammed earlier, after shooting a 23-year-old man, Deputy Commissioner Brian Nadeau said at a news conference Thursday at police headquarters where the department first released the videos.

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The Baltimore Sun could not reach Tyson’s family Thursday for comment.

Tyson was shot Feb. 25 in the ramp of the Harbor Parking Garage, near the 600 block of E. Lombard St. after police said he shot the other man after a confrontation outside a CVS drug store at East Pratt and North Gay streets.

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A passerby flagged down police officers in the area, including Officer Robert Brown. Other officers provided medical aid to the 23-year-old victim, who was later taken to a hospital and survived.

Nadeau said Brown followed Tyson in his patrol vehicle to East Pratt Street, stopping his vehicle in front of Tyson, causing Tyson to fall to the ground. Brown then got out and chased Tyson on foot, along with two other officers, where they confronted him in the parking garage.

Body camera footage of a police-involved shooting in the 600 block of E. Lombard Street on February 25, 2021.

Nadeau identified the other officers Thursday as Robert Cucchiaro and Edgard Ayala-Lopez.

Video from Brown’s camera shows Tyson draw the weapon, at which point officers can be heard shouting at Tyson before they quickly fire upon him.

Nadeau said the three officers fired 16 rounds.

Neadeau said investigators believe Tyson’s gun jammed earlier in the evening, and the gun would not have been able to go off if he had tried to fire at the officers.

“He did not fire the weapon” in the garage, Nadeau said.

Tyson was taken to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

In an earlier statement, the police department said officers had ordered Tyson to put his hands up when he “produced a handgun and attempted to fire the weapon,” and it misfired.

Baltimore Police Commissioner Michael Harrison said last month that the officers were acting appropriately.

“Having reviewed bodycam footage personally, with our mayor, with our city administrator, with our deputy commissioner, we can say that our officers were being proactive and doing exactly what the citizens of Baltimore expect,” Harrison said shortly after the shooting.

Neadeau said the department still is investigating the gun used by Tyson and whether he obtained it legally. He said it was not connected to other shootings.

Neadeau said the officers remain on administrative duty.

Brown joined the department in 1991, Cucchiaro in 2017 and Ayala-Lopez since in 2017.

“A shooting like this has affected a lot of people,” including the officers, the shooting victim and his family, as well as Tyson’s family, Nadeau said.

“We want to make sure we provide assistance, to make sure we put somebody back to work that they are ready to go back to work,” Nadeau said of the officers.

Tyson was the second man shot and killed by law enforcement in the city last month

Dontae Green was killed in a shootout in a West Baltimore rowhouse Feb. 4. A U.S. marshal was critically injured as police say Green opened fire on marshals from inside a closet. The marshals had been after him for a shooting in a North Baltimore grocery store five days earlier.

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