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Baltimore police charge a 15-year-old in connection with June’s triple shooting in Fells Point

A 15-year-old has been arrested in the June triple shooting in Fells Point that prompted a swift response from police and the city after local businesses bemoaned the sometimes raucous crowds that gathered as pandemic restrictions eased.

Baltimore Police said Thursday that the boy was arrested early Tuesday at home on North Decker Street in the Elwood Park neighborhood, north of Fells Point. He was taken to Central Booking Intake Facility and charged as an adult with first-degree attempted murder.

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Police did not name the teen.

The shooting occurred around 12:30 a.m. June 6 when police on patrol were directed by citizens to the 1700 block of Thames Street, where the officers found two men, 24- and 26-years-old, with gunshot wounds. Medics transported both to the hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

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Police then received a call about a shooting victim a couple of blocks away, at Aliceanna Street and South Broadway. That victim, a 21-year-old man, had been shot in the head but survived.

A week later, on June 13, police responded to a report of shots fired in the 1600 block of Aliceanna Street. There, they found that several vehicles had been shot up, and one person suffered cuts, police said.

The violence in the waterfront neighborhood, home to many bars and restaurants, prompted some residents and local businesses to demand city leaders curb the crowds that flooded the area as COVID-19 restrictions began to ease.

A group of more than 30 business owners threatened to withhold their taxes if city leaders did not address crime, trash and other issues they said are plaguing the waterfront neighborhood.

The city reacted swiftly, adding more police officers to patrol the more white, affluent and touristy neighborhood. That action frustrated other neighborhood leaders, who complained that they did not receive the same urgency from city officials for similar complaints. Some city council members also questioned whether other city neighborhoods saw less police protection as a result.

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