xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Baltimore DPW worker killed Friday night had a young son and enjoyed his work, his mother said

Dayvon Mason, 32, was killed in a shooting Friday night at York Road and East Cold Spring Lane around 7:23 p.m. while working for the Baltimore Public Works Department. He had a son and was a giving, thoughtful person, his mother said.
Dayvon Mason, 32, was killed in a shooting Friday night at York Road and East Cold Spring Lane around 7:23 p.m. while working for the Baltimore Public Works Department. He had a son and was a giving, thoughtful person, his mother said. (Rochelle Mason/Courtesy of Rochelle Mason)

Before Davyon Mason would leave for each shift as a garbage collector for the city and when he returned home, he would tell his mother he loved her, she said.

But on Friday, Rochelle Mason said, she wasn’t greeted warmly by her son at the end of his shift. Instead, she said a family member called, telling her to go to Johns Hopkins Hospital. He had been injured in a shooting in North Baltimore.

Advertisement

At the hospital, Mason said detectives pulled her aside, and asked her whether she knew if her son had gotten into any trouble. She said she told them no, and then they told her he had died.

“After that I tried to get myself together. How am I to tell his two sisters?” she recalled.

Advertisement
Advertisement

And she had to tell Mason’s only son.

Mason, 32, was one of two Baltimore City Department of Public Works employees shot shortly before 7:30 p.m. Friday night.

Police said a second man, who they did not publicly identify, was seriously injured.

Police said the men had been operating a sanitation vehicle at the intersection of York Road and East Cold Spring Lane when one or more people approached them.

“There was some type of exchange” before the pair were shot and injured, Police Commissioner Michael Harrison said at a news conference at the scene Friday.

Police said Monday there have been no arrests in the shooting and they did not provide additional information, including a possible motive.

At Friday’s news conference, Mathew W. Garbark, director of the city’s Department of Public Works, spoke about the loss for the solid waste bureau, which comes as employees there already had suffered a difficult year because of the pandemic.

“The hearts of DPW are heavy,” he said. “We have lost one of our own and another one is in serous condition.”

Employees, he said, “suffered the strains of the COVID pandemic, and they have come back every time... The men and woman of this bureau are some of the best people to ever work with, and they will continue the job no matter what.”

Antoinette Ryan-Johnson, president of the City Union of Baltimore, which represents public works employees, said Monday that the shooting “underscores the scourge of violence that continues to trouble our city. It hits closer to home for us because the victims are among our labor family.”

Mason’s family said he had worked for the city for several years, lifting trash cans to the back of the truck.

“All he did was work,” his mother said. “He was happy.”

He liked his job, but he had expressed interest in becoming a firefighter and was beginning the application process, his family said. He also had plans of moving out of his mother’s apartment on West Fayette Street, and moving in with his girlfriend.

When he wasn’t working, her son spent a lot of time with his son, Dayvon Jr., Rochelle Mason said. She shared a recent picture she took of him sitting on a blue all-terrain vehicle he bought for his son. Another showed him smiling in the passenger seat of his work truck.

Mason said police have not shared information with her about her son’s killing. She said she told detectives she did not know why anyone would want to hurt her son, and said he was not involved in any criminal activity, which she said makes his death more tragic.

“This is so sad for a man who is not out there,” she said. “I raised none of my children to be like that.”

Mason held back tears as she spoke about her son.

“I only had one son. Now I have no son,” she said.

Harrison has asked for the public’s help in identifying the shooter.

“We’re pleading with anyone in the city who knows something… to call us,” he said. “We have to hold these people accountable. This happened in broad daylight.”

Anyone with information is urged to contact homicide detectives at 410-396-2100.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement