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'Somebody has seen something’: Family looks for answers after father was carjacked and killed in Baltimore

Marchers want Baltimore's stop-snitching culture to end after father was carjacked and killed.

The last few days, Chyna Lucas’ son, Zion, wakes up every morning asking for his father.

“He’s only 2 years old. He wakes up very morning saying, ‘Daddy, daddy, daddy, daddy,’ ” Lucas said.

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Baltimore police say the boy’s father, 27-year-old Donye Lowther, was killed and carjacked Sept. 25 in the 2200 block of Fleetwood Ave. His body was found around 11:30 p.m. near an apartment complex dumpster in the same area.

“There’s too many bodies dropping out here, man! It’s too many!” Lucas said Monday night, standing in the parking lot near where Lowther’s body was found. “Kids are growing up without their fathers around here. It’s sad. How much longer is this going to go on?”

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She was flanked by a group of about 30 — some from various anti-violence groups and others members of Lowther’s family. They prayed under a street light along Fleetwood Avenue, which connects to a Baltimore high school at Pinewood Avenue to the south and a playground at Corona Court to the north, where a group of about eight kids played as the sun set in their Northeast Baltimore neighborhood.

The group, led by Lisa Molock and her bullhorn, marched around the block demanding answers for Lowther's death and an end to the city's "stop snitching" culture.

They chanted, “No justice, no peace,” a common refrain heard at anti-police brutality demonstrations, although Monday night the message was aimed at the residents of the Pangea Pines Apartments.

“You see all of these windows,” Molock, founder of the anti-violence group No One Left Unhelped, said, indicating the apartments. “Somebody has seen something.”

Molock and Lucas said as of Monday night, no one has spotted Lowther’s 2017 silver Toyota Camry with tinted windows, which may contain clues to his death. Lowther’s family members said he was meeting someone in the area, although it’s unclear who he was meeting or why.

Lucas, 21, was in disbelief after after a social media posting seeking answers for Lowther’s death was shared almost 2,000 times.

"You're telling me no one has seen the car?" she said skeptically Monday.

Molock, a case worker by day, reached out to the family over the weekend to offer help from her organization, which aids families affected by violence.

“I’m trying to make my city a better place. We need a supernatural healing right now,” Molock said. “They need to get rid of the stop snitching. We are a city in crisis.”

As the group marched, Molock switched between chanting “No justice, no peace” to “Put down the guns and stop the violence” and “D! for Donye.”

Chris Marcus, 38, and a Pangea Pines resident, was walking his dog when the demonstration snaked around his building.

"It gets worse and worse every year," Marcus said of the city's crime.

He added that he didn’t know there was a homicide in his neighborhood, although he said he wasn’t surprised. “It’s been out of control,” he said.

Alicia Queen, 23, was smoking a cigarette with her sister, Carli, 20, while sitting on the steps leading to their apartment.

“It’s too close to home,” Alicia Queen said. “It’s not like it was two years ago when we moved in.”

Both said they supported the marchers and their goal of loudly demanding answers.

“We both have young children, and we’re worried,” Alicia Queen said. “I would march until I can’t move.”

Lowther was described as hard worker who loved to have fun.

“He stayed in his lane and did what he had to do to provide for his family,” said Parise Haskins, Lowther’s godmother.

Gregory Pitts, Lowther’s cousin, said the slain 27-year-old was more like a brother.

“He always wanted to do good for his family,” Pitts said. “He could bring a smile into any room he was in.”

Baltimore Police ask anyone with information about this case to call (410) 396-2100 or call Metro Crime Stoppers at 1-866-7LOCKUP.

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