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Baltimore police sergeant charged with misconduct in office, theft

A Baltimore police sergeant has been charged with misconduct in office and attempted theft after a prosecutor reported him for lying about performing tasks for overtime pay, court records show.

The misdemeanor charges against Sgt. Robert Dohony, a 27-year veteran, were filed Thursday and accuse him of an attempted theft of between $100 and $1,500, according to online court records. Dohony has been suspended, the department said.

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Charging documents say Assistant State’s Attorney Matthew Pillion authorized Dohony to earn overtime and monitor recorded jail calls of an inmate. Dohony said he had listened to seven jail calls and submitted overtime slips for two dates, totaling more than 10 hours.

Pillion then accessed the system used for listening to jail calls and found Dohony had spent only 90 minutes listening to jail calls. He did not listen to any calls on one of the dates for which he had sought six hours of overtime pay.

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Baltimore Police Det. Anthony Faulk wrote in the charging documents that Dohony was confronted by prosecutors and “expressed remorse, claimed he was overwhelmed that day with handling the duties of a shooting sergeant and made a mistake.”

“Although Sgt. Dohony wasn’t compensated for the overtime, he presented it with the intentions of being compensated,” Faulk wrote.

Dohony was not arrested and received a summons with a court date scheduled for March 12. He did not respond to a request for comment Thursday and no attorney was listed for him in court records.

Police spokeswoman Lindsey Eldridge said Dohony’s police powers have been suspended and he has been assigned to administrative duty. She declined to comment on the pending investigation.

The State’s Attorney’s Office did not respond to questions.

Dohony was paid $153,775.42 in fiscal year 2019 with a base salary of $108,755 per year, according to Baltimore public records.

The longtime homicide detective was working in the citywide shootings unit, which handles non-fatal shootings, in March 2018, the time of the alleged offenses. He also investigated police shootings in 2016.

Baltimore Sun reporter Justin Fenton contributed to this article.

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