Mayor Bernard C. "Jack" Young, left, and Police Commissioner Michael Harrison, center, ask witnesses to come forward with information about the shooting of Sgt. Isaac Carrington in a robbery attempt near his home on Aug. 8. Three weeks later Harrison is seeking the public's help finding another suspect who shot at an officer.
Mayor Bernard C. "Jack" Young, left, and Police Commissioner Michael Harrison, center, ask witnesses to come forward with information about the shooting of Sgt. Isaac Carrington in a robbery attempt near his home on Aug. 8. Three weeks later Harrison is seeking the public's help finding another suspect who shot at an officer. (Amy Davis / Baltimore Sun)

Nearly three weeks after a veteran police sergeant was shot outside his home by masked suspects, no one has been arrested, Baltimore police remain tight-lipped and police officers say they are facing increasingly emboldened and violent criminals.

As Sgt. Isaac Carrington continues a long recovery after being shot multiple times outside his home Aug. 8, detectives say they are frustrated.

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“At this point, there is nothing new on the case," police spokesman Det. Donny Moses said Tuesday. Moses declined to provide new details, including additional descriptions of the suspects, whether they are believed to be connected to other cases, or potential motives.

“We have to get as much as we can. It’s the purpose of the investigation,” Moses said. “We’re frustrated one of ours is hurt."

Early Tuesday morning another city police officer narrowly avoided being injured after someone opened fire on him.

Police said just after 1 a.m. the driver of a silver SUV tried to strike an officer who had stopped on Reisterstown Road in Northwest Baltimore. Later, when another officer spotted the same vehicle on Pennsylvania Avenue, the driver got out and began firing a handgun as the officer approached. The shooter then fled.

Commissioner Michael Harrison asked anyone with any information to call police.

“We want to be able to hold people accountable,” Harrison said at a news conference Tuesday at police headquarters. “This is an armed and dangerous person who not only is willing to harm police officer, but is very likely to cause harm to any other person in the community. It speaks to the brazenness of today’s criminal element.”

Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 3 President Sgt. Mike Mancuso said the incident shows the city’s violence is rampant.

“How out of control has Baltimore become when criminals walk up on a uniformed officer, in a marked patrol car, and fire shots at the officer,” he said in a statement.

A 9mm shell casing was later found at the crime scene., police said.

After following the fleeing car through the city, a police major stopped the pursuit once officers reached southbound Interstate 295. Harrison said supervisors called off the chase out of concern for safety as the pursuit became a high speed chase through neighborhoods.

Baltimore City Council President Brandon Scott said the latest incident shows “no one is off limits in Baltimore. Police officers, children," he said. “It doesn’t matter,” he said.

But Scott said the recent violence — including the more than 220 homicides so far this year — is the result of a lack of steady leadership and vision in the department, which has had five commissioners in four years and until recently has been without any formal plan.

“The criminal element has been emboldened,” he said.

Police continue hunting for Carrington’s attackers.

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Carrington was shot outside his home on Summerfield Avenue in an apparent robbery. A neighbor, Lemmie Brady III, previously told The Baltimore Sun the two were standing outside talking when two masked men walked up and said to "Give me your s—.” The neighbor said he dropped his phone and wallet and ran into the house. Police said Carrington ran the opposite direction and at least one gunman followed him and shot him repeatedly.

Carrington was not in a uniform and police haven’t said whether he was armed.

The day after the shooting, the investigation led police to Lansdowne, where an officer saw a vehicle matching the description of the one allegedly driven by the suspect. But police ultimately ruled out the people taken into custody as having any involvement in the Carrington case. On August 10, police pursued another blue Acura into Parkville, but did not announce any arrest.

Carrington was the second city police officer shot this year. Sgt. Bill Shiflett was wounded in an exchange of gunfire while responding to an active shooter at a North Baltimore methadone clinic in July. The gunman, Ashanti Pinkney, was killed in the exchange. A phlebotomist, whom Pinkney shot before the officers entered the clinic, also died.

Harrison said he’s experienced other instances of violence involving officers during his career, but maybe not as “close together.”

“I think the thing that concerns all of us is the number of times its happened in a short period of time.... But our detectives are resilient, our officers are resilient, we’re not backing down, we’re stepping up, we’re running toward it instead of away from it and we will catch these people," he said.

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