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Sixth defendant pleads guilty in Black Guerrilla Family drug case

A sixth defendant has pleaded guilty in a federal indictment that new documents show involved the Black Guerrilla Family gang.

Last year, an indictment alleged Shawn and Jerrod Jackson, Davon Taylor, Christopher Bowser, Rodney Russell, Rodney Gould and Antoine Webster were involved in a conspiracy to distribute herion. Since then, all but one of the defendants have pleaded guilty, and their agreements with the government show the case targeted a BGF operation in Park Heights and Belvedere. They also shed light on the hierarchy of drug distribution in two high-crime areas of the city.

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In Russell's plea agreement filed Tuesday, he admitted that he was a member of the BGF who received money and drugs from street-level distribution shops operated by other members of the gang. The Drug Enforcement Administration used intercepted phone conversations to build the case, records show.

Last month, Gould's plea described him as a "ranking member" of the BGF who received money and drugs from street-level distribution operations - specifically those run by the Jacksons. His plea said the Jacksons were also members of the BGF, who paid Gould with proceeds from their drug sales because of his rank in the organization.

"Based upon these intercepted conversations, the DEA determined that the defendant was a member of the BGF," Gould's plea reads.

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Other documents showed Bowser was to as a "street lieutenant" who would direct Taylor, called a "street hitter," to provide drugs to customers from Pennsylvania after Shawn Jackson had arranged the deals. DEA agents stopped the Pennsylvania customer after such transactions "various times" and recovered packaged heroin, according to the plea agreements.

Records show that on at least some of the calls, Jackson was communicating with a DEA agent.

"I want to come see you before it gets bad," the agent told Jackson in one recorded call on Oct. 29, 2012. "I got $200."

"I'm here," Jackson replied.

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The DEA gave an undercover Baltimore Police officer the phone and sent him to purchase drugs in the 3100 block of W. Belvedere Ave. When he arrived, Jackson sent Taylor to conduct the transaction.

When police moved in for the arrest, Jackson put his vehicle in reverse and drove backwards across Belvedere Avenue until he struck a parked GMC Yukon. A search of Jackson's car recovered $1,000 in cash from the rear seat and almost $9,000 from the trunk.

Webster, the last to be arrested, has pleaded not guilty but court records do not list any upcoming hearings.

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