xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Officer William G. Porter trial recap: Day 6

Baltimore Sun reporter Justin Fenton talks about the start of second week of the Freddie Gray case trial. Dr. Carol Allan, the medical examiner who ruled Freddie Gray's death a homicide was questioned in Baltimore Police Officer William Porter's trial as it entered a second week.

Gray died April 19 after suffering a severe spinal cord injury while in police custody. Porter, one of six police officers charged in his death, is the first to stand to trial in Baltimore. (Baltimore Sun video)

The second week of the trial of Baltimore Police Officer William Porter began Monday morning at a downtown Baltimore courthouse.

The day began with testimony from Dr. Carol Allan, the medical examiner who performed the autopsy on Freddie Gray, and ended with testimony from an emergency medical technician who found Gray unresponsive at the Western District police station.

Advertisement
  • Judge Barry Williams declined to declare a mistrial because of revelations that prosecutors failed to disclose information that Gray told a police officer about a prior back injury the month before he was arrested in the incident that led to his death.
  • Williams ruled that the information could be introduced at trial.
  • Carol Allan testified that while officers may not have intended to kill Gray, his death resulted from police actions and wasn’t purely accidental. She and a second medical expert for the prosecution — Dr. Morris Marc Soriano, an Illinois neurosurgeon — both testified that Gray’s life could have been saved had Porter called for a medic when Gray first told him he needed one.
  • Joseph Murtha, Porter’s attorney, sought to sow doubt about the medical experts’ findings. He suggested the homicide ruling from the medical examiner was simply a “theory” that is unsupported by evidence.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement