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Pasadena teen charged in slaying of young sister waives extradition, returns to Anne Arundel

Anne Arundel County police said Monday the teenager charged in the killing of his 5-year-old, half-sister in Pasadena waived extradition and has returned to Anne Arundel County to face charges as an adult, including first-degree murder.

Anaya Jannah Abdul’s body was discovered Oct. 3, suffering from multiple sharp force injuries.

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Stephen Jarrod Davis 2nd, 17, of Pasadena has been charged with first-degree murder, second-degree murder, second-degree child abuse, first-degree assault, second-degree assault and unlawful taking of a motor vehicle.

Police said Davis fled to Ohio after the incident but waived extradition last week. Officers brought him back to Anne Arundel County on Friday, and he is being held at Jennifer Road Detention Facility. A bail review is scheduled for 11 a.m. Tuesday.

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Davis’ arrest and return to Anne Arundel come a little more than a week after officers responded to a morning call Oct. 3 at the 4100 block of Apple Leaf Court where they discovered Anaya’s body. An autopsy released Sunday revealed Anaya died due to multiple sharp force injuries with officials ruling the death a homicide.

Around 11:30 a.m. the same day Anaya was discovered, detectives, with the assistance of Ohio police agencies, were able to locate Davis in the Springfield, Ohio, area. Davis was arrested by Ohio authorities. There were no additional criminal charges placed in Ohio.

Anaya was a kindergartner at Fort Smallwood Elementary. Davis is a senior at Chesapeake High School.

Fort Smallwood’s Principal Bobbie Kesecker sent a letter to the school community following Anaya’s death.

In it, Kesecker wrote, “Anaya was a very sweet little girl."

Anaya’s family included some details as well, such as Anaya adored princesses and enjoyed making videos, dancing and singing.

Counselors and other members of student services were provided to students affected by her death.

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