Gregory Richard Korwek, 40, now faces 20 criminal charges for illegally possessing firearms and ammunition. He fatally shot a man on his lawn in Pasadena.
Gregory Richard Korwek, 40, now faces 20 criminal charges for illegally possessing firearms and ammunition. He fatally shot a man on his lawn in Pasadena. (Anne Arundel County Police Department)

The Pasadena homeowner who police say shot and killed a man on his front lawn Wednesday was legally disqualified from possessing firearms, including the shotgun court records suggest he used in the fatal encounter.

Jeffrey Thomas Dickinson, 44, was pronounced dead outside the home in the 1400 block of Orr Court, according to charging documents.

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The homeowner, Gregory Richard Korwek, 40, now faces 29 criminal charges for illegally possessing firearms and ammunition because of a felony conviction, court records show. He is being held without bond.

Officers recovered shotgun shells from Korwek’s pockets and later recovered 14 firearms from his house, including six handguns, three shotguns and five rifles — none of which he was allowed to have, charging documents detail.

Assistant State’s Attorney Katherine Smeltzer said at a bail review hearing for Korwek Thursday afternoon that police found hundreds of rounds of ammunition and that at least two of the long guns recovered were assault rifles.

“(Korwek) is an extreme risk to public safety," she told Judge Laura M. Robinson.

Robin Henley, an attorney representing Korwek for the bail review, asked Robinson to consider house arrest or some amount of bond. He noted that Korwek, a Severna Park High School graduate, runs a contracting business, is married and is “very involved” in the lives of his two children — one of whom has health issues that require regular visits to doctors offices.

Anne Arundel County police wrote in charging documents that detectives are investigating the fatal shooting as a homicide.

Korwek called police around 9:25 a.m. Wednesday, telling them he believed Dickinson had threatened him and was driving to his house on a scooter from the area of Duvall Highway and Fort Smallwood Road. Korwek told police he was armed with a shotgun and “would use it if he felt threatened," charging documents detail.

Five minutes later, Korwek called 911 again and told police he shot Dickinson, according to charging documents.

Police said Wednesday an officer arrived on scene within six minutes of the call, at which point Korwek “came running out saying ‘Help me, help me, I shot him.’”

The officer rendered medical care and alerted the fire department. Fire personnel responded shortly thereafter and pronounced Dickinson dead.

Police have yet to disclose whether Dickinson was armed, though it’s now evident Korwek was armed with weapons he was prohibited from possessing.

According to charging documents, Korwek is prohibited from possessing any firearms because he pleaded guilty in 2005 to first-degree burglary. A judge suspended his entire sentence and did not hand down any probation, online court records show.

Online records show Korwek was convicted of illegally possessing a shotgun before. He pleaded guilty to the charge in 2003 and was ordered to pay a $250 fine. He also faced four counts of reckless endangerment, which were all dropped by Anne Arundel County prosecutors.

“Certainly this would be a different situation if you were not disqualified from possessing firearms,” Robinson told Korwek.

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And, she said, a man died as a result of Korwek firing one of those weapons he was disqualified from owning.

She ordered Korwek remain held on no bond.

Henley declined to comment after the hearing. He explained during the hearing that he was only representing Korwek at the bail review and he expected Korwek would meet with another attorney.

Detectives were working Wednesday to learn about the history between the two men and what brought them together on the front lawn in the residential neighborhood built decades ago on former farmland.

Neighbors told The Capital it was an otherwise normal morning Wednesday and that their neighborhood was quiet, apart from occasionally random foot traffic. They added that the community was close-knit.

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