WHAT OTHERS ARE SAYING

The Baltimore Sun

If Hillary Clinton somehow wins the presidency in November, she may very well look back on an icy, rain-soaked March day in Ohio as the moment that saved her campaign. Because by winning here Tuesday, Mrs. Clinton can rightfully claim that voters in one of the nation's most important swing states have implored her not to give up the fight.

As for Barack Obama, Ohio's tradition-bound Democrats served notice that they're not ready to ratify his coronation. They'll likely come around if he's the nominee, but for now, he didn't close the sale in a must-win state.

Translating Tuesday's victory into forward momentum may be difficult for Mrs. Clinton. Mr. Obama now leads in national polls of Democrats, a factor that will certainly influence some of the unbound "superdelegates" who hold the balance of power in this tight nominating process.

- Cleveland Plain Dealer

Some in the party and certainly some political pundits say it is mathematically impossible for Mrs. Clinton to overcome Mr. Obama's delegate lead and that she should drop out of the race. That would let Mr. Obama start his run to the November general election immediately, getting an even start with Mr. McCain.

The editorial board has recommended Mr. Obama as the nominee, but we see no reason to believe that Mrs. Clinton should give up. Tuesday's balloting shows that Democrats' hearts are still closely divided between her and Mr. Obama, and the nation's remaining voters deserve their say. The next big battleground will be Pennsylvania on April 22.

- Fort Worth (Texas) Star-Telegram

The heat on Sen. Barack Obama has risen in recent days. Choose your denunciation: He's an ingenue, he's a liar, he's a crook. And it won't stop there. Tuesday night's primary election returns ensure that he'll see more of the same rough treatment in the days and weeks ahead.

Sen. Hillary Clinton held her own Tuesday, breaking her string of 11 straight losses to Mr. Obama. Mrs. Clinton will hang around for the next state primaries and caucuses, which means she'll continue attacking Mr. Obama - perhaps more aggressively than before. It's working.

What does that mean for Barack Obama? That he's living in an uncomfortable time warp. His immediate past now becomes the future he'll have to keep reliving.

- Chicago Tribune

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