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THE DISH

THE BALTIMORE SUN

Eating strategies

Low-carb dieting may be on the wane. According to a new survey commissioned by the American Institute for Cancer Research, four in five weight-conscious Americans are relying on the old-fashioned diet strategy of eating more fruit and vegetables.

The survey is one of a number of recent studies that show low-carb dieting isn't as popular as it once was. In this latest study, 65 percent of respondents said they had tried to lose weight. Of those, 81 percent said they had increased produce in their diet, 76 percent had decreased the amount of fat they consumed, 60 percent had decreased carbohydrates and 38 percent had increased the amount of meat, eggs and other proteins they ate.

The AICR has updated its New American Plate brochure, calling for Americans to gradually change the way they eat so that two-thirds or more of their plate contains vegetables, fruit, whole grains or beans and one-third or less contains meat or dairy products. For more information, visit www.aicr.org.

Plastics welcome

Now you can stick your plastic cookware in the dishwasher without fear that it will be warped.

General Electric has come up with a new plastics cycle on its GE Profile dishwasher. The cycle is designed to safely clean plastic items in either the top or the bottom rack of the dishwasher and a fan-assisted drying option draws moist air off the plastic items.

The dishwasher is available in stores where appliances are sold at a price ranging from $799 to $1,249, depending on its configuration and finish.

Tackling hunger

Kate Joyce, a former Peace Corps volunteer from Baltimore, was recognized recently by the Dannon Co. for efforts to fight hunger.

Joyce, a volunteer at the Center for Poverty Solutions, won the yogurt company's 2004 Strike Out Hunger Challenge because of her work with low-income schoolchildren. She helped kids at Dr. Rayner Browne Elementary School in East Baltimore build an organic garden at the school and developed a curriculum to teach kids about healthful eating. She now is working to extend the program to other schools in the state.

The Dannon contest searched to reward families and / or organizations that are helping to strike out hunger in America. Joyce's prize includes a $10,000 donation for her chosen charity, the Center for Poverty Solutions, and $1,000 in free groceries for her and her husband.

TV's heated competition

Get ready for a new food fight. The Food Network has decided to turn its Iron Chef America specials into a full-blown series starting 9 p.m. Sunday.

Ten new episodes will feature chefs Bobby Flay, Mario Batali, Masaharu Morimoto and Cat Cora, who will take on chefs Rick Bayless, Ming Tsai, Roberto Trevino and others.

The first episode will feature grilling gurus Flay and Bayless.

The show is based on the Japanese cult classic Iron Chef.

EVENTS

Learn how to make fish and beef stock for soup at 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday at Chef's Expressions, 9526 Deereco Road, Timonium. $40. Call 410-561-CHEF. Contact person: Katie Bittinger.

Learn to make dishes of comfort food 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Monday at Long Reach High, 6101 Old Dobbin Road, Columbia. $19, plus $20 materials fee. Call 410-313-4700 or visit Howard County Recreation and Parks at www.co.ho.md.us / RAP / RAP_HomePage.htm.

Learn to make hearty Italian soups 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 26, at Donna's in Columbia, 5850 Waterloo Road. $35. Call 410-659-5248, ext. 112.

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