MOVIES THAT MATTER Forget abput best and worst. The real power of movies is that they can change the way we thinkg and feel -- and the impact can last a lifetime.

THE BALTIMORE SUN

Remember your first?

For me, it was "Mary Poppins." Definitely "Mary Poppins." My distant but distinct memory is of me and Darcy Gibson, my lifelong best friend, attending "Mary Poppins" in Des Moines, Iowa. We were 4 years old.

As the audience streamed in, we realized something was missing: C.J., Darcy's 2-year-old brother. Darcy's mother dispatched us to look under seats and headed for the lobby. Suddenly, we heard laughter coming from the front of the theater. There, a tiny head could be seen, bobbing over the first row. It was C.J., marching back and forth across the stage in front of the screen, to the approbation of the crowd.

A tough act to follow. "Mary Poppins" dazzled us with its flying umbrellas, spoonfuls of sugar, nice nannies and other screen magic. But forever after, the wonders unleashed by the movie have been inextricably linked to C.J.'s impromptu preamble.

That moment -- when a little boy bridged the space separating the watchers from the watched -- encapsulated what happens when movies work best: We are astonished, enchanted, edified. Voids are filled that we didn't know we had. C.J.'s performance also underscored a fact all but lost in the age of the VCR: Movies are better when they're seen with a crowd.

This reminiscence was prompted by the news that on June 16 the American Film Institute will announce what it deems to be "the greatest 100 American movies of all time."

The AFI, a 30-year-old organization dedicated to advancing and preserving the cinematic arts, provided a list of 400 titles from which to choose. The criteria for nomination were that the films be fictional and more than 60 minutes long; that they be in English and feature significant American contribution; that they have enjoyed critical recognition; that they have won major awards; that they have been popular over time; that they have historical and cultural significance. (The list is clearly Hollywood-centric: no documentaries, short films or experimental movies allowed.)

The AFI invited 1,500 filmmakers, critics, historians and industry executives -- not to mention the Clintons and the Gores -- to vote on what is sure to become a canon of the American cinema. (AFI didn't ask, but we'd like your input, too. On Pages XX and XX is a ballot with the 400 nominees. Choose 100 or fewer from that list and send it to us. We'll announce Baltimore's choices when AFI announces its choices.)

The 100 films picked will surely be respectable in every way, as are the nominees. And therein lies a problem. Some of the most important movies of my life -- and I'm sure in yours -- had an impact completely out of proportion to their artistic or technical merits. These are the movies we love for no good reason other than that we saw them at crucial times of our lives, and they gave us the things we needed most.

Take "Mary Poppins." By the AFI's criteria, this too-sweet and illogical trifle would never be considered great. But if I were voting, how could I ignore the movie that introduced me to the movies?

So much of a movie's power derives, not from its technical sophistication or artistic genius, but simply from who and where and with whom you were when you saw it. They are the firsts -- the films that magically reached beyond the screen to touch the viewer. They may seem silly or stupid or just plain bad today, but once they astonished.

Consider a core sample taken from the greatest films of my life:

"Bambi" -- It taught me and generations of other children that nothing is more cathartic than a good cry (and that no one could mess with the fragile emotional life of a 6-year-old like Uncle Walt).

"My Little Chickadee" -- An otherwise forgettable Western, starring Mae West and W.C. Fields, taught me the crucial life lesson that timing is everything and that, more than anything else, comedy endures.

"The Wizard of Oz" -- The first movie I saw more than once, introducing me to the cinema as a place of serial pleasures and deeper readings.

"To Kill a Mockingbird" -- The first movie that featured children who resembled ones I actually knew, and maybe even was myself -- wise, cruel and liberated from false sentimentality.

"Dark Victory" -- The first time I heard an audience laugh at what was supposed to be tragedy. Bette Davis played a doomed heiress ("I'll have the prognosis negative!"), who dies one of the most bathetic death scenes since Camille. I've been a camp follower ever since.

"His Girl Friday" -- This must have been on during an afternoon when I was home sick from school. Watching Rosalind Russell and Cary Grant crack wise with the electric energy of the newsroom as a backdrop commenced a lifelong romance with newspapers and newspaper movies.

"Gone With the Wind" -- It presented the horrors of war on a level even a child of my age (I must have been 10) could understand. Two scenes in particular stand out: the famous crane shot above a field of dead and dying soldiers, and the silhouette of a horse breaking down while Scarlett whips him mercilessly. These twin images formed a personal iconography of suffering that lasts to this day.

"Marnie" -- When I snuck downstairs to watch it on late-night television it scared the bejeebers out of me, but I couldn't tear my eyes away. Tippi Hedren plays a kleptomaniac whose boss, Sean Connery, discovers her stealing. They marry, and he plumbs her troubled past, which got into areas my sleepy little head couldn't fathom. Still, it made an indelible impact. "Psycho" and "The Birds" may be more lauded jewels in Hitchcock's crown, but this weird little number introduced to me the joys of Gothic, and the notion that terror and pleasure could exist simultaneously.

"Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?" -- It was the first time I had seen black characters portrayed as anything more than stereotypes (see "His Girl Friday" and "Gone With the Wind").

"Cabaret" -- The first "grown-up" movie I ever saw. My father insisted that I go with him to see it when I was 12. I remember giggling whenever homosexuality was mentioned, but its deeper message -- about the link between intolerance and decadence, denial and despair -- managed to penetrate even my callow brain. Seeing it marked the first time a movie wasn't just an idle entertainment, but a vector for serious ideas.

"Grand Illusion" -- Jean Renoir's masterpiece, about two World War II soldiers escaping a prison camp, was the first foreign film I ever saw (in my high school French class). It was also the first war picture I saw in which action was transcended -- indeed overwhelmed by -- human relationships. (This was also the first movie to use the stately beauty of long takes and deep focus, years before "Citizen Kane.")

"Star Wars" -- Not because of the movie itself but because I was there the first day it played, sweating out a long afternoon in a line that snaked around the theater. Hundreds of teen-agers were linked with one silent, unanimous thought: We'll always be able to say We were here.

"Woodstock" -- The first documentary I saw outside health class. It started a lifelong passion for movies that star real people.

"Days of Heaven" -- I don't remember a word and, yet, I remember every moment. This was the first film I can recall that told its story through images rather than words. Richard Gere and Brooke Adams played drifters who settle in Texas in the early years of this century. Other than those bare elements, the story comes back only sketchily. What still takes my breath away is the memory of burnished scenes of trains and grasshopper infestations and endless seas of undulating wheat.

"Casablanca" -- Introduced me to Hollywood romance. Like "It's a Wonderful Life" and "Lawrence of Arabia," this is one movie I could have seen only once and been perfectly content. And, like those films, it made me understand that the only way to experience it completely is within the collective swoon of an audience.

"My Brilliant Career" -- The screen debut of Judy Davis as a headstrong Australian girl at the turn of the century. I had never seen light that color before (I later learned that's called cinematography), or a lead character so unconventionally beautiful. She never compromised her own strong personality, and she still got the guy.

"Raging Bull" -- My first Martin Scorsese movie, and the first time I experienced movies-as-anthropology. Never had a film felt so intimate, so keenly observed and so emphatic in its directorial vision.

"Dazed and Confused" -- Richard Linklater's rambling, episodic ensemble comedy about a summer-night-in-the-life of graduating high school seniors. It invested my bland Midwestern teen-age years, during the even blander 1970s, with the enchantment and meaning of an Ingmar Bergman film. Who knew Ted Nugent could conjure such wistfulness?

"Two for the Road" -- Stanley Donen's portrait of a marriage, starring Albert Finney and Audrey Hepburn at her most chic, was the first cult movie I ever saw, and the first time I had seen a story related so ingeniously through multiple flashbacks (I later learned this is called editing).

"High School Confidential," "The Oscar," "The Battle of Algiers," "Shakes the Clown" and the Zapruder film, over and over again -- These are the litmus films, which I was urged to watch by friends and sweethearts because to know and love these movies was to know and love them. Remember "The Sorrow and the Pity" in "Annie Hall"? (For the uninitiated, "Shakes the Clown" is a little straight-to-video gem, proclaimed, on the box, as "The 'Citizen Kane' of alcoholic clown movies!" It is.)

My "Sorrow and the Pity" would have to be "Sweet Smell of Success." Burt Lancaster plays a Walter Winchell-like newspaper columnist. Tony Curtis plays the sleazy press agent who becomes embroiled in Lancaster's sick plot to foil his sister's marriage. The year: 1957. The place: New York. The words: Clifford Odets and Ernest Lehmann. The music: Elmer Bernstein and Chico Hamilton. The look was noir, the music was brash and brassy, the talk had more bubbles than a flute of Dom Perignon (and was sharper than the driest martini). When I watched it I was home. To this day, "Sweet Smell of Success" is the one movie I could watch every day and never be bored.

"Sweet Smell of Success" is clearly flawed, marred by a mealy-mouthed romance insipidly played by Martin Milner and Susan Harrison. But I love it in spite of that gaffe. In fact, I've come to love films precisely because of their flaws.

At a time when most claims on our emotions are computer-generated, when that space between the movie and the audience isn't bridged but broadened by ever-louder bombast and ever-tightening technical control, a movie's missteps reveal that there's a human being back there $l somewhere.

Hence my unwillingness to pile on the anti-"Titanic" backlash. Yes, the screenplay is simplistic; yes, the love story is corny; yes, the movie cost too much money; yes, it has a certain air of the bullying behemoth about it. But those weaknesses stem from the man who made it -- not from the usual committee system by which movies its size are made.

"Titanic" can also be credited with restoring a genuine sense of collectivity to the movie-going experience -- one based on shared emotion rather than mutual effects overload -- that has been missing at the multiplex of late.

But "Titanic" is the exception. More often, that intangible psychic space between the movie and me is bridged on a more intimate scale.

Last August, when I was interviewing for this very job, I was at loose ends for an evening in a strange city. I took a long walk to Fells Point, where I happened upon a tiny, cozy-looking theater called the Orpheum. The marquee announced a double-feature of "The Letter" and "All About Eve."

I had arrived just in time to catch "The Letter," starring Bette Davis as a British woman living in colonial Malaysia who commits a crime of passion. Compared to the flashier "All About Eve," "The Letter" is a quieter, more obscure film. It won't be one of the AFI's 100 greatest films. It didn't even make its list of nominees.

I climbed the narrow, tread-worn staircase and slipped into the tiny auditorium with eight or ten other people. The seats were plush. The screen was small. The popcorn was fresh. And as the lights went down on that hot summer night, a handful of strangers settled back in the dark to watch a movie they had probably seen dozens of times before.

And we were astonished all over again.

You Pick: The 100 Best Movies of All Time

The American Film Institute is going to select the top 100 American movies of all time based on this list of 400 nominees. But before it does, we want to know your choices. Check off up to 100 movies and send your ballot to "Top 100 Movies," The Sun, 1235 Limit Ave., Baltimore, Md. 21239, no later than May 31. Or go to our Web site at http: //www.sunspot.net for more information there. After AFI announces its picks June 16, we'll reveal Baltimore's.

Title of Movie, Year

1. Richard III, 1912

2. The Birth of a Nation, 1915

3. The Cheat, 1915

4. Intolerance, 1916

5. The Poor Little Rich Girl, 1917

The '20s

6. Within Our Gates, 1920

7. The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, 1921

The Kid, 1921

9. Safety Last, 1923

10. The Thief of Bagdad, 1924

11. The Big Parade, 1925

12. The Gold Rush, 1925

13. Greed, 1925

14. The Phantom of the Opera, 1925

15. Ben-Hur, 1926

16. The General, 1927

17. The Jazz Singer, 1927

18. Sunrise, 1927

19. Wings, 1927

20. The Crowd, 1928

21. The Wind, 1928

22. The Broadway Melody, 1929

The '30s

23. All Quiet on the Western Front, 1930

Little Caesar, 1930

25. Morocco, 1930

26. Cimarron, 1931

27. City Lights, 1931

28. Frankenstein, 1931

29. The Public Enemy, 1931

30. Freaks, 1932

31. Grand Hotel, 1932

32. I Am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang, 1932

33. Scarface: The Shame of a Nation, 1932

Trouble In Paradise, 1932

35. Cavalcade, 1933

36. Duck Soup, 1933

37. 42nd Street, 1933

38. King Kong, 1933

39. She Done Him Wrong, 1933

40. Sons of the Desert, 1933

41. It Happened One Night, 1934

42. The Scarlet Empress, 1934

43. The Thin Man, 1934

44. David Copperfield, 1935

45. The Little Colonel, 1935

46. Mutiny on the Bounty, 1935

47. A Night at the Opera, 1935

48. Top Hat, 1935

49. Dodsworth, 1936

50. Fury, 1936

51. The Great Ziegfeld, 1936

52. Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, 1936

53. Modern Times, 1936

54. My Man Godfrey, 1936

55. Swing Time, 1936

56. The Awful Truth, 1937

57. Camille, 1937

58. The Life of Emile Zola, 1937

59. Lost Horizon, 1937

60. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937

A Star Is Born, 1937

62. The Adventures of Robin Hood, 1938

63. Boys Town, 1938

64. Bringing Up Baby, 1938

65. You Can't Take It With You, 1938

Babes in Arms, 1939

67. Beau Geste, 1939

68. Destry Rides Again, 1939

69. Gone With the Wind, 1939

70. Goodbye, Mr. Chips, 1939

71. Gunga Din, 1939

72. Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, 1939

73. Ninotchka, 1939

74. Only Angels Have Wings, 1939

75. Stagecoach, 1939

76. The Wizard of Oz, 1939

77. Wuthering Heights, 1939

78. Young Mr. Lincoln, 1939

The '40s

79. The Bank Dick, 1940

80. Fantasia, 1940

81. The Grapes of Wrath, 1940

82. His Girl Friday, 1940

83. The Mark of Zorro, 1940

84. The Philadelphia Story, 1940

85. Pinocchio, 1940

86. Rebecca, 1940

87. Citizen Kane, 1941

88. How Green Was My Valley, 1941

89. The Lady Eve, 1941

90. The Little Foxes, 1941

91. The Maltese Falcon, 1941

92. Sergeant York, 1941

93. Sullivan's Travels, 1941

94. Bambi, 1942

95. Casablanca, 1942

96. Cat People, 1942

97. The Magnificent Ambersons, 1942

98. Mrs. Miniver, 1942

99. Now, Voyager, 1942

100. The Pride of the Yankees, 1942

101. Road to Morocco, 1942

102. To Be or Not To Be, 1942

Woman of the Year, 1942

104. Yankee Doodle Dandy, 1942

105. Bataan, 1943

106. Cabin in the Sky, 1943

107. The Ox-Bow Incident, 1943

108. Shadow of a Doubt, 1943

109. Double Indemnity, 1944

110. Going My Way, 1944

111. Hail the Conquering Hero, 1944

112. Laura, 1944

113. Meet Me in St. Louis, 1944

114. The Miracle of Morgan's Creek, 1944

115. Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo, 1944

116. To Have and Have Not, 1944

117. The Lost Weekend, 1945

118. The Best Years of Our Lives, 1946

119. The Big Sleep, 1946

120. Gilda, 1946

121. It's a Wonderful Life, 1946

122. My Darling Clementine, 1946

123. Notorious, 1946

124. The Yearling, 1946

125. Gentleman's Agreement, 1947

126. Miracle on 34th Street, 1947

127. Out of the Past, 1947

128. Force of Evil, 1948

129. Red River, 1948

130. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, 1948

@131. Adam's Rib, 1949

132. All the King's Men, 1949

133. The Heiress, 1949

134. Intruder in the Dust, 1949

135. A Letter to Three Wives, 1949

136. Sands of Iwo Jima, 1949

137. The Third Man, 1949

138. Twelve O'Clock High, 1949

139. White Heat, 1949

The '50s

140. All About Eve, 1950

141. Cinderella, 1950

142. Gun Crazy, 1950

143. The Gunfighter, 1950

144. Sunset Boulevard, 1950

145. Winchester '73, 1950

146. The African Queen, 1951

147. An American in Paris, 1951

148. The Day the Earth Stood Still, 1951

A Place in the Sun, 1951

150. Strangers on a Train, 1951

151. A Streetcar Named Desire, 1951

152. The Greatest Show on Earth, 1952

153. High Noon, 1952

154. The Quiet Man, 1952

155. Singin' in the Rain, 1952

156. The Band Wagon, 1953

157. From Here to Eternity, 1953

158. Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, 1953

159. Shane, 1953

160. Stalag 17, 1953

161. The War of the Worlds, 1953

162. The Caine Mutiny, 1954

163. Carmen Jones, 1954

164. On the Waterfront, 1954

165. Rear Window, 1954

166. Salt of the Earth, 1954

167. A Star is Born, 1954

168. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, 1954

169. The Blackboard Jungle, 1955

170. East of Eden, 1955

171. Lady and the Tramp, 1955

172. Marty, 1955

173. Mister Roberts, 1955

174. The Night of the Hunter, 1955

175. Oklahoma!, 1955

176. Rebel Without a Cause, 1955

177. The Seven Year Itch, 1955

178. Around the World in 80 Days, 1956

Giant, 1956

180. Invasion of the Body Snatchers, 1956

181. The Searchers, 1956

182. The Ten Commandments, 1956

183. An Affair to Remember, 1957

184. The Bridge on the River Kwai, 1957

Paths of Glory, 1957

186. 12 Angry Men, 1957

187. The Defiant Ones, 1958

188. Gigi, 1958

189. Run Silent, Run Deep, 1958

190. Touch of Evil, 1958

191. Vertigo, 1958

192. Anatomy of a Murder, 1959

193. Ben-Hur, 1959

194. The Diary of Anne Frank, 1959

195. Imitation of Life, 1959

196. North by Northwest, 1959

197. On the Beach, 1959

198. Pillow Talk, 1959

199. Shadows, 1959

200. Some Like It Hot, 1959

The '60s

201. The Apartment, 1960

202. Elmer Gantry, 1960

203. Psycho, 1960

204. Spartacus, 1960

205. Breakfast at Tiffany's, 1961

206. El Cid, 1961

207. The Hustler, 1961

208. Judgment at Nuremberg, 1961

209. One Hundred and One Dalmatians, 1961

210. A Raisin in the Sun, 1961

211. Splendor in the Grass, 1961

212. West Side Story, 1961

213. Days of Wine and Roses, 1962

214. Lawrence of Arabia, 1962

215. The Longest Day, 1962

216. The Manchurian Candidate, 1962

217. To Kill a Mockingbird, 1962

218. What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?, 1962

The Birds, 1963

220. Cleopatra, 1963

221. From Russia With Love, 1963

222. Hud, 1963

223. It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World, 1963

224. The Pink Panther, 1963

225. Tom Jones, 1963

226. The Americanization of Emily, 1964

227. Dr. Strangelove, 1964

228. Goldfinger, 1964

229. Mary Poppins, 1964

230. My Fair Lady, 1964

231. Cat Ballou, 1965

232. Doctor Zhivago, 1965

233. The Sound of Music, 1965

234. Fantastic Voyage, 1966

235. A Man for All Seasons, 1966

236. Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, 1966

237. Barefoot in the Park, 1967

238. Bonnie and Clyde, 1967

239. Cool Hand Luke, 1967

240. The Graduate, 1967

241. Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, 1967

242. In Cold Blood, 1967

243. In the Heat of the Night, 1967

The Jungle Book, 1967

245. The Producers, 1967

246. Two for the Road, 1967

247. Bullitt, 1968

248. Funny Girl, 1968

249. Night of the Living Dead, 1968

250. Oliver!, 1968

251. Planet of the Apes, 1968

252. Rosemary's Baby, 1968

253. 2001: A Space Odyssey, 1968

254. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, 1969

@255. Easy Rider, 1969

256. Medium Cool, 1969

257. Midnight Cowboy, 1969

258. The Wild Bunch, 1969

The '70s

259. Five Easy Pieces, 1970

260. Little Big Man, 1970

261. Love Story, 1970

262. M*A*S*H, 1970

263. Patton, 1970

264. A Clockwork Orange, 1971

265. Dirty Harry, 1971

266. Fiddler on the Roof, 1971

267. The French Connection, 1971

268. The Last Picture Show, 1971

269. McCabe and Mrs. Miller, 1971

270. Cabaret, 1972

271. Deliverance, 1972

272. The Godfather, 1972

273. Sounder, 1972

274. American Graffiti, 1973

275. Badlands, 1973

276. The Exorcist, 1973

277. Last Tango in Paris, 1973

278. Mean Streets, 1973

279. The Sting, 1973

280. The Way We Were, 1973

281. Blazing Saddles, 1974

282. Chinatown, 1974

283. The Conversation, 1974

284. The Godfather Part II, 1974

285. Dog Day Afternoon, 1975

286. Jaws, 1975

287. The Man Who Would Be King, 1975

Nashville, 1975

289. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, 1975

The Rocky Horror Picture Show, 1975

291. All the President's Men, 1976

292. Carrie, 1976

293. Network, 1976

294. The Outlaw Josey Wales, 1976

295. Rocky, 1976

296. Taxi Driver, 1976

297. Annie Hall, 1977

298. Close Encounters of the Third Kind, 1977

The Goodbye Girl, 1977

300. Saturday Night Fever, 1977

301. Star Wars, 1977

302. Coming Home, 1978

303. Days of Heaven, 1978

304. The Deer Hunter, 1978

305. Grease, 1978

306. National Lampoon's Animal House, 1978

307. Alien, 1979

308. All That Jazz, 1979

309. Apocalypse Now, 1979

310. Breaking Away, 1979

311. Kramer vs. Kramer, 1979

312. Manhattan, 1979

The '80s

313. Atlantic City, 1980

314. The Empire Strikes Back, 1980

315. Melvin and Howard, 1980

316. Ordinary People, 1980

317. Raging Bull, 1980

318. Return of the Secaucus 7, 1980

319. Chariots of Fire, 1981

320. On Golden Pond, 1981

321. Raiders of the Lost Ark, 1981

322. Reds, 1981

323. Blade Runner, 1982

324. E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, 1982

325. Fast Times at Ridgemont High, 1982

326. Gandhi, 1982

327. Missing, 1982

328. Sophie's Choice, 1982

329. Tootsie, 1982

330. The Big Chill, 1983

331. Local Hero, 1983

332. El Norte, 1983

333. Return of the Jedi, 1983

334. The Right Stuff, 1983

335. Risky Business, 1983

336. Terms of Endearment, 1983

337. Amadeus, 1984

338. Beverly Hills Cop, 1984

339. Ghostbusters, 1984

340. The Killing Fields, 1984

341. Stranger Than Paradise, 1984

342. Back to the Future, 1985

343. Brazil, 1985

344. The Color Purple, 1985

345. Out of Africa, 1985

346. Witness, 1985

347. Blue Velvet, 1986

348. Children of a Lesser God, 1986

349. Ferris Bueller's Day Off, 1986

350. Hannah and Her Sisters, 1986

351. Platoon, 1986

352. Broadcast News, 1987

353. Fatal Attraction, 1987

354. The Last Emperor, 1987

355. Lethal Weapon, 1987

356. Moonstruck, 1987

357. The Untouchables, 1987

358. Big, 1988

359. Dangerous Liaisons, 1988

360. Die Hard, 1988

361. The Last Temptation of Christ, 1988

362. Rain Man, 1988

363. Batman, 1989

364. Born on the Fourth of July, 1989

Dead Poets Society, 1989

366. Do the Right Thing, 1989

367. Driving Miss Daisy, 1989

368. Field of Dreams, 1989

369. Glory, 1989

370. Sex, Lies and Videotape, 1989

The '90s

371. Dances With Wolves, 1990

372. Goodfellas, 1990

373. Pretty Woman, 1990

374. Beauty and the Beast, 1991

375. Rambling Rose, 1991

376. The Silence of the Lambs, 1991

377. Terminator 2: Judgement Day, 1991

378. Thelma & Louise, 1991

379. The Player, 1992

380. Unforgiven, 1992

381. The Fugitive, 1993

382. The Joy Luck Club, 1993

383. Jurassic Park, 1993

384. Philadelphia, 1993

385. Schindler's List, 1993

386. Sleepless in Seattle, 1993

387. Forrest Gump, 1994

388. The Lion King, 1994

389. Pulp Fiction, 1994

390. The Shawshank Redemption, 1994

391. Apollo 13, 1995

392. Babe, 1995

393. Braveheart, 1995

394. Casino, 1995

395. Leaving Las Vegas, 1995

396. Sense and Sensibility, 1995

397. Toy Story, 1995

398. The English Patient, 1996

399. Fargo, 1996

400. Jerry Maguire, 1996

Pub Date: 5/17/98

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