'Marshal' finds home on Saturday night

THE BALTIMORE SUN

After its sneak preview last Thursday in the "NYPD Blue" time slot, "The Marshal" nestles tonight into its regular Saturday-night time slot. That's good news, because it means broadcast TV is providing something worth watching in prime time tonight. Otherwise, all the action is on cable.

* "Empty Nest" (8-8:30 p.m., Channel 11) -- Leigh Taylor-Young, usually seen on TV these days as a former mayor on "Picket Fences," guest stars tonight as a woman to whom Harry 'D (Richard Mulligan) becomes instantly and strongly attracted -- for a while. NBC.

* "The Marshal" (10-11 p.m., Channel 2) -- I haven't seen tonight's episode, but Jeff Fahey, in the title role, comes off as one of the most likable law-enforcement TV loners since Robert Blake in "Baretta" -- and since tonight's show features guest star Craig Wasson, it ought to be a strong one. ABC.

* "Tales From the Crypt" (11 p.m.-midnight, Channel 45) -- The second of two "Crypt" episodes tonight, though tamer than the HBO version, nonetheless offers viewers a very different look at Teri Hatcher, the star of "Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman." Fox.

Cable

* "The Saga of Andy Burnett" (2-2:50 p.m., DIS) -- There's no telling whether your kids will be amused by this 1957 series, since, even though it's in color, it's an incredibly dated western (starring Jeff York), and not because it's set in the 1820s. Even so, if you can get your children interested in what passed for average entertainment in the '50s, this may be a fun hour to share.

* "Ace Ventura, Pet Detective" (8-9:30 p.m., HBO) -- This, meanwhile, is average entertainment for the '90s, with Jim Carrey in the role that propelled him to stardom and made him the comic idol of today's youngsters. Many find that concept repugnant, but I neither deny nor am immune to Carrey's appeal. This 1994 movie, like the star, is silly and all over the place -- but in a broad comedy context, that's not necessarily bad.

* "Angie" (8-9:50 p.m., SHO) -- Geena Davis is very strong, and occasionally very funny, in this 1994 film -- but its light tone at the outset takes a startlingly, jarringly serious tone partway through, making the last half seem almost like a disconnected sequel.

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