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Ross Doud Eckert, 53, an educator who...

Ross Doud Eckert, 53, an educator who sounded one of the earliest alarms about the risks of contracting Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome through blood transfusions, died Friday of AIDS complications in Pomona, Calif. He was a Claremont McKenna College professor who received blood transfusions to treat hemophilia. His interest in the safety of the blood supply began long before he was found to be infected with the virus that causes AIDS. Mr. Eckert wrote of potential dangers in the blood supply in a 1985 book, "Securing a Safer Blood Supply." He wrote several articles and addressed Congress in 1990 on the threat of hepatitis in the supply.

The Rev. Joseph Donceel, 88. a scholar of psychology, philosophy and theology at Fordham University, died Dec. 15 at the Jesuit infirmary on the university's Rose Hill, New York, campus after a long illness. He joined the faculty in 1944 and was named professor emeritus of philosophy in 1972.

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Frank G. Ryder, 57, an inventor, pilot and aviation enthusiast, died with his wife and son in the crash of his single-engine plane shortly after takeoff in Rochester, Minn., Thursday. Mr. Ryder sold his family business, Ryder International Inc., earlier this year concentrate on his hobby of constructing World War I replica aircraft. He was chairman of the First Warplanes Association and started the Aerodrome vintage plane festival in 1992. Among his inventions were surgical instruments and automotive products.

Martin Caprow, 38, an AIDS-infected attorney who compared his lawsuit against the firm that fired him with the case depicted in the movie "Philadelphia," died Wednesday in Los Angeles of complications from AIDS. Mr. Caprow took his San Diego law firm to court despite his failing health in an effort to combat employment discrimination against AIDS patients. His case went trial during the theater run of "Philadelphia," in which a gay lawyer with AIDS successfully sues the homophobic boss who fired him. But in Mr. Caprow's case, the judge rejected his claim, saying his bosses had intended to fire him before they learned about his illness.

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Hans Herlin, 68, who cleverly wove current history into his novels, has died. Mr. Herlin, whose best-known book, "Commentaries," was published in 1975 in the United States, suffered a heart attack and died at his home in the Burgundy region of southern French, St. Martin's Press of New York said Friday. His first novel, "Friends," was published in 1974 and sold 1 million copies, the publishers said.

John Eastburn Boswell, 47, a Yale University historian who upended medieval scholarship by finding not only that homosexuality was tolerated in the Middle Ages, but also that same-sex unions were celebrated liturgically, died yesterday in the Yale infirmary. He lived in New Haven. The cause was complications from AIDS, a friend, Jerry Hart, said. Some scholars and theologians disputed his findings, which gained wide notice in 1980 with the publication of "Christianity, Social Tolerance, and Homosexuality: Gay People in Western Europe From the Beginning of the Christian Era to the Fourteenth Century."



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