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CHRONICLING A YEAR'S WORTH OF HAPPENINGS

YEAR IN REVIEW: Every year about this time, we order a double cheese pizza, crack open a six-pack of Diet Pepsi, don our reading specs and get down to the task of sifting through a year's worth of our columns. It always perks us up to read about your comings and goings throughout the year, and it's doubly nice to share them with you once again. So at the close of 1991, we invite you to take a stroll down memory lane. As always, thanks for the memories.

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DOUBLE TAKES: A new agency opened in January that represented celebrity look-alikes called Reflections Promotional and Entertainment Agency. The list of faux personalities included everyone from Paul Hogan's Crocodile Dundee to Queen Elizabeth II, although pop singer Cher was one of the most requested. (But not in Sonny Bono's house!)

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BLACK-TIE DEBUT: Channel 45's "News at Ten" debuted to Baltimore audiences on June 3 with a Hollywood-type approach. All the newsies marked their on-the-air debut by wearing tuxedos. Don't know if they were rentals, though.

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BUTCHERING AN ACT: The Roland Park Centennial Celebration held a reunion in June at St. Mary's Seminary for friends and former residents of the neighborhood. The entertainment? The butchers from Eddie's Supermarket who lip-synced a routine. Such hams.

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THE O'S ZONE: In January, rock singer Joan Jett, who later in the year belted out a riveting emotional "Star-Spangled Banner" at the Orioles' last game at Memorial Stadium, was one of the first to turn out for the Orioles Fantasy Camp in Sarasota, Fla., joining about 100 other hard-core fans. Joan, a left-handed hitter, was reported to have a lot of "pop" in her bat.

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A LITTLE DEPP'LL DO YA: Television and movie star Johnny "Cry Baby" Depp was spied checking out real estate prospects in the Big Crab with perennial sweetie, actress Winona Ryder. The Comedy Factory Outlet's Gard Jones joked that Depp had been signed to do the Elvis Presley story. "They're calling it 21 Jump Suits!"

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BOOK SMARTS: Howard County residents Eileen Buckholtz and Ruth Glick, who publish romance novels under the pen name Rebecca York, released "Shattered Vows," their second romantic suspense tome set in Baltimore. Sounds familiar. . . . Locally based author Harrison Livingstone, whose controversial book "High Treason" made the New York Times best-seller list, launched a new book called "Cry of the Invisible," a collection of writings of those who've been homeless or in mental institutions. . . . Baltimore writer Caroline Miller, whose first book, "My Name is Caroline," came out in paperback in March, appeared on the TV show, "To Tell the Truth". . . . Marketing pros Gwynn and Bob Willis co-authored a book called "Day Trips from Baltimore: Getaways Less Than 2 Hours Away."

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BY GEORGE: Maryland Public Television head writer and producer Dick George began taping humorous commentary for National Public Radio's "All Things Considered," heard by 7 million people worldwide. "I haven't had this much fun since 'Crabs,' " he said, referring to the satirical review he produced for MPT.

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OPENING REMARKS: Leilani's Restaurant's Leilani Wallace and husband Lloyd moved from West Barre Street to the former Scarlett O'Hara's on Antique Row. . . . Gin Nakagawa opened the Sushi Cafe on Thames Street in Fells Point, billing himself as a "sushiologist." . . . Chippendale promoter Brian Lazarus, also of Nard's Rock and Roll fame, joined with some chums to open Johnsons Bar and Grill at the old Schaefer's Pub on Calvert Street.

Harborplace added Johnny Rockets, a '40s-style hamburger joint, and Nickel City Grille, an upscale eatery, to its numerous restaurants. . . . Joey Chiu's Greenspring Inn opened in September and was an instant hit with Greenspring Valley fans. . . . The Walters Art Gallery's Hackerman House Museum of Asian Art opened in May with an elegant black-tie fete catered by the Classic Catering People, who also opened the Pavilion Restaurant there (open for lunch and private parties).

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In Fells Point, Chuck Doering expanded his John Stevens Ltd. to include a garden area and waitresses. . . . Shortly after Jimmy Mikula and Tom Douglas opened their Weber's on Boston Street in June, they had an instant following. . . . Vern Liphart and Don Davis took over the former Flamingos on Eager and Charles, redecorated it, added pool tables and a piano bar and renamed it Central Station.

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MARYLAND-BASED author Tom Clancy let it be known that he wanted no part of the movie "Patriot Games," starring Harrison Ford, which he claimed had absolutely nothing to do with the book he'd penned by the same name. Actor Ford would thrill Annapolitans in December when he shot scenes from the movie there.

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NO KEY TO HIS HEART: Pop singer Patti LaBelle kept Mayor Kurt Schmoke waiting more than 45 minutes back in muggy August for a chance to present LaBelle a key to the city before her performance at Pier 6 Concert Pavilion. When she finally appeared on stage and acknowledged his presence, Hizzoner had already split. "I'm scared of that man," LaBelle told the crowd.

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WHEN ASKED where he'd most like to eat while in town, actor Vince "Moonstruck" Gardenia piped up, "Sabatino's." Turns out Gardenia, who was honored here by the International Film Festival in April, is old friends with Sab's co-owner Vince Culotta.

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GOD'S COUNTRY: Staffers at WCAO-AM were stunned when several radio veterans like Johnny Dark and Ron Matz were let go in November after a format change from country to gospel. "It was like a death in the family," a saddened Matz said.

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GONZO JOURNALIST Hunter Thompson didn't necessarily captivate the crowd at Max's on Broadway when he appeared there in February for a Q&A; session. The temperamental writer, armed with a fifth of Scotch, mumbled through two shows, refusing even to acknowledge certain questions from the capacity crowd.

One query he made, however, was of Max's owner Ron Furman. "Are there any bars in the area?" he asked. "About 29," Furman replied.

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THE WONDER OF YOU: In June, pop legend Stevie Wonder dropped by Berry & Elliot's at the Hyatt downtown for a late supper. His entourage sipped on several bottles of Dom Perignon while Stevie drank pineapple juice. After dinner, the superstar sang along with one of his tunes.

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SEIZING THE DAY: Tennis pro Martina Navratilova charmed all at Pam Shriver's Charity Tennis Festival black-tie gala at the Candler Building in November. After receiving a proclamation from Mayor Kurt Schmoke making it "Martina Day in Baltimore," the muscular blonde joked, "Jim Palmer just told me it was Cal Ripken Day too -- can they do that?"

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PAINTING THE TOWN: Actor Billy Dee Williams was honorary guest at the Baltimore School for the Arts' "Expressions '91" in March, chaired by Esther Pearlstone and Amy Elias. Williams told all he was concentrating his energies on his artwork -- gearing up for his one-man show in New York.

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EYE DO'S: Some local folks who got hitched in '91? The National Aquarium's Kathy Cloyd tied the knot with attorney Joel Sher early in the year. . . . Pier 500's Connie Crabtree made it official with longtime luv Baltimore Deputy Police Commissioner Woody Burritt in February, as did longtime bachelor attorney Rick Schmidt with pretty Jennifer Ann Bishop.

Channel 45's Ken Walter walked the aisle with fashion designer Dawn Silber. . . . Channel 2 anchorman Stan Stovall flew off to Texas to marry WMAR-TV colleague, reporter Yolanda Graham. . . . The National Aquarium's Lynn Keelty married local entrepreneur Stu Frankel.

The Harbor Court's Michael Rork and sales exec Betsy Goldfeder took a brief honeymoon after saying their nuptials last spring. . . . St. Paul's teacher Pam Pitts married Maybelline CFO Robert Pierce at the posh Peabody Court. . . . WJZ-TV's Bob Turk married Tina Avig in December and later honeymooned in Hawaii.

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IN BRIEF: Local writer Paul Peroutka, who was born with cerebral palsy, staged a reading of some of his works at Loyola College's McManus Theatre. . . . Sandee Kolodny, coordinator of the Mammography Screening Services at the University of Maryland Cancer Center, was invited to the White House as a guest of Barbara Bush and Marilyn Quayle.

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REEL BALTIMORE: Theatergoers at the skin-crawling "The Silence of the Lambs" howled at the references to our fair city even though the movie wasn't shot here. The biggest yuks came when a creepy psychiatrist at the Baltimore State Hospital for the Criminally Insane tells Jodie Foster, "Baltimore can be a great place if you have the right guide". . . . Producer/director Steve "On the Block" Yeager returned to his favorite location -- the Block -- when he was hired to shoot an episode of the popular Fox TV show, "America's Most Wanted."

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MAKING SCENTS: Tavern owner Jim Turner, who owns Turners on Cross Street in Federal Hill, had patrons turning up their, ah, noses at his newest addition to the bar. Jim went New Age by adding an aromatherapy machine behind the bar to keep it smelling sweet.

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SLY UNDERTAKING: The L.A. Times reported that actor Sylvester Stallone had purchased a 400-plus-acre horse farm in suburban Maryland sometime early in the year, but no local Sly sightings.

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ACTING UP: Jamie Zemarel, son of noted band leader Zim Zemarel and singer with his big band, landed a role on the soap "As the World Turns," playing a bailiff in a courtroom. . . . Local actor/artist Dave Klein was cast as a judge in an episode of "America's Most Wanted," which aired in May. In November, Klein would join local artists Joan Erbe and Van Smith in exhibiting their works at the Nye Gomez Gallery.

Channel 2 anchorman Stan Stovall made his acting debut in David Mamet's "Homicide," which was shot in Baltimore, as a bodyguard who gets sucker punched. "I had great fun," Stovall laughed.

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ON HOME TURF: Celeb visitors to the International Turf Festival at Laurel Race Course included former baseball star Steve Garvey, Redskins owner Jack Kent Cooke and the "Bob Newhart Show's" Mary Frann, who boasted, "I'm winning."

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CLOTHES ENCOUNTERS: Comedian-actor Steve Landesberg, best known as the deadpan Sergeant Dietrick on "Barney Miller," turned up as spokesman for an advertising campaign for Jos. A. Bank Clothiers based in Baltimore. . . . Flaky pop star Cyndi Lauper nearly busted down the door of Tim Potee's Dreamland on Read Street to get to his vintage wares the morning after appearing at Hammerjacks the night before. "She tried on every hat in the store," Potee dished. She only bought a pair of vintage '50s sea horse glasses, though.

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HAIR TRANSPLANT: Longtime Read Street fixture, the Hair Garage, moved to Owings Mills after 20 years in its downtown locale. Owned by John Michael and Rosemary Salconi, the salon now bills itself as Salconi and Company.

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SLY FOX: Actor Michael J. Fox scrapped plans to stay in Baltimore when his director Michael Caton Jones, who was directing him in "King Hollywood," decided he was unhappy with the Hanover Bridge as a location and chose one in Richmond, Va., instead. Jones' most recent film, "Memphis Belle," was produced by the co-owners of the Inn at the Colonnade's Richard Rymland and wife Catherine Wyler, which is just one of the reasons he and Fox had booked a room there.

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A LITTLE BIDDY OLDER: Guests jammed into the Sphinx Club on Pennsylvania Avenue for a champagne celebration of the birthday of legendary owner Biddy Wood.

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POLITICAL STEAKS: Then mayoral candidate Bill Swisher was overheard at Frazier's Restaurant in Hampden on steak night -- Monday -- opting for hamburger instead of filet mignon. "I'm an East Baltimore boy," he explained. Maybe the steak would have helped him at the polls.

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EM-BRACE-ABLE JOHN: "When I was young," filmmaker John Waters told a packed house at the Comedy Factory Outlet, "I knew something was wrong with me mentally, but I wanted something to be wrong with me physically."

When the dentist wouldn't put braces on his teeth, the young Waters wedged paper clips in his gums. "They bled," he explained, "but I was a much happier child."

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COLOR COORDINATED: One of the Big Crab's sexiest single holdouts, attorney Susan Green, who specializes in divorce, got hitched in April, and even if she had considered changing her name to his, it wouldn't have made much difference! Hubby Sid, a Canadian travel magnate, has the same last name. The lovebirds met while checking into a hotel in Puerto Rico when there was some confusion as to whose luggage belonged to whom.

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WHAT SHE SAID, HE SAID: Folks in Baltimore got a tad peeved when "He Said, She Said" star Elizabeth Perkins talked disparagingly about the time she spent in Baltimore filming the movie. Perkins did not attend the world premiere of the movie at the Senator in February, though co-star Kevin Bacon did, much to the delight of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, for which it was a benefit.

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TABLE HOPPING: Spied at the Polo Grill having dinner with the Victor Frenkils and Dr. Levi Watkins -- civil rights activist Rosa Parks. Parks was being honored at the Kennedy Center in D.C. a few days later. . . . Singer Tony Bennett dropped by Lou Baumel's Harvey House on Charles Street to see his old boss Lou. Bennett worked for Baumel for $250 a week 40 years ago at the old Club Charles.

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The nationally known Drifters performed on the street (instead of under the boardwalk or on the roof) at the grand opening of Luigi's Garden at Luigi Petti's Restaurant in Little Italy in May. . . . "Coach" TV star Shelley Fabares popped by the Polo Grill in the spring for a nibble while in town on behalf of the Alzheimers Association.

The original Fifth Dimension, Marilyn McCoo and Billy Davis Jr., dropped by Bill Bateman's Cub Hill restaurant and urged the owner to open an eatery in California.

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LOCAL HERO: Baltimore native and talk show host Montel Williams greeted fans and family (he's son of city transportation chief Herman Williams and wife Marjorie) at a reception in his honor at Corbi's restaurant in August. The star of the "Montel Williams Show" asked Mayor Schmoke if he'd give city employees an hour break at 11 a.m. so they could watch his show.

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AIR APPARENT: Blast owner Ed Hale loaned out his private jet so ABC's Barbara Walters could attend a speaking engagement in town in honor of Sinai Hospital's 125th anniversary. Later, Hale would announce his news-making takeover bid of the Bank of Baltimore at a luncheon in his honor hosted by the Ad Club attended by Governor Schaefer.

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"I think he's the best governor in the entire U.S., and I don't think he should be dumped on like so many people do," Hale told all.

"Speaking of being dumped on . . ." he continued, lamenting the Blast's dismal season.

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FESSIN' UP: Former actor turned winemaker Fess "Davy Crockett" Parker turned out at a reception in his honor at the offices of the Winner Distributing Co. to tout the first of his Parker Wines, which he makes in California. "You look much taller than you did on my lunch box," joked owner Marc Winner.

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TRADING PLACES: Longtime Harvey House pianist Mary True moved her act to Harrison's Pier 5 on weekends. . . . Caterer Charles Levine would take over the Pimlico Restaurant from his relatives Al and Reta Davis and later relinquish it to them to return to catering full time. In November, the legendary Pimlico would close its doors permanently. In December, a D.C.-based Jasper's announced it would be opening there in '92.

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STARGAZING: Actor James Earl Jones made the rounds of Baltimore in May, hooking up with home-grown talent like Artie Donovan and Cal Ripken Jr. while shooting television commercials for C&P; Yellow Pages. . . . Actor Robert Vaughan, best known for "The Man From U.N.C.L.E.," filmed a Harrah's Casino commercial in Baltimore.

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PENTHOUSE PET: Bob Hope, in town to perform at a USF&G-sponsored; benefit at the Meyerhoff, stayed at the posh Harbor Court Hotel in its penthouse suite with wife Delores and pet poodle Baxter. Da Mimmo's restaurant sent over a seafood platter and veal chop. "The veal chop was for Baxter," owner Mary Ann Cricchio laughed.

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A PREGNANT PAUSE: Central Casting held an open call for extras for the movie "That Night," which announced it would be shooting in Baltimore in the fall -- and they weren't joking. One request was for young women with child. The movie, scheduled for a spring '92 release, wrapped in November.

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SCENES FROM A MALL: The BSO Gala had a new look in September when it moved its party headquarters to the Gallery at Harborplace and the Stouffer Harborplace Hotel. Chairpersons Mike Sullivan, CEO of Merry Go Round, and wife Jeanne, a chef, were ecstatic with the results.

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SHAKE AND BAKE: W. B. Doner's perpetually tanned head honcho Herb Fried was honored by the Ad Club of Baltimore. "For years he's been baking," the invite read, "it's time he was roasted."

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A FULL WEINGLASS: Stories began to circulate that Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass was interested in buying the Orioles. That later changed to buying a football team for Baltimore.

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In October, Boog would open the fourth of his Boogie's Diners in Los Angeles with a glitzy bash attended by such stars as Morgan Fairchild and Casey Kasem. The "Boog" continued to downplay his former playboy lifestyle, enthusiastically displaying family photos of his twins, Bo and Sky, wife Pepper and daughter Sage to news gatherers.

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A MURDEROUS AFFAIR: David Mamet's "Homicide" premiered in Baltimore with a gala reception at the Senator Theatre even though the star, Joe Mantegna, and the director/writer, David Mamet, were unable to attend. Associate producer Scott Ferguson welcomed all by reading a telegram from Mamet, who told the audience, "Have some crabs at Obrycki's." Only a few people got up and left, though.

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UNDERCOVER AGENT: Jim Palmer would begin shooting the pilot for his television show, "Living Today," at various locations throughout town. In one segment on exercise, the Hall of Famer LTC would appear in his Jockey underwear. In December, he would tell American Health magazine that more people knew him for his Jockey ads than for his pitching.


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