Early bird tickets for Baltimore’s BEST party on sale now!

Slimy 'Pamela Smart Story' never illuminates lurid crime

THE BALTIMORE SUN

Sleazy, exploitative and ultimately depressing, CBS' "Murder

in New Hampshire: The Pamela Smart Story" should never have been pumped from the cesspool of network television onto our TV screens.

But this rush-job about the teacher who enticed her student-lover to kill her husband pops up at 9 p.m. tonight. It gives voyeurism a bad name.

Because producers did not obtain story rights from many of those involved, the tele-movie rarely ventures beyond the courtroom testimony in the notorious Smart case, and it never illuminates the basic story that everybody has already heard:

The then-22-year-old teacher had an affair with one of her 15-year-old students. By withholding sex and berating him, she eventually got him to murder her insurance-salesman husband.

There's nothing wrong with lurid true-crime tales. With fine acting and complex construction, such TV productions as last season's "A Killing in a Small Town" and "Love, Lies and Murder" managed to convey suspense and examine the most interesting aspect of so many criminal cases -- motivation.

But in "Murder in New Hampshire," there appears to be no motivation.

Cecelia Pierce, a student who overheard several plotting sessions and helped police obtain incriminating tapes from Smart, was never charged with a crime.

Instead, she told interviewers, she sold her story for $100,000.

If this movie is the result, the producers paid $99,998.02 too much.

Copyright © 2019, The Baltimore Sun, a Baltimore Sun Media Group publication | Place an Ad
55°