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Pig heart transplanted into Maryland man | PHOTOS

A Maryland man is doing well after surgeons and clinicians from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the University of Maryland Medical Center performed the first successful transplant of a genetically modified pig’s heart Friday to save his life, officials from the health system said Monday.
(Mark Teske)
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A Maryland man is doing well after surgeons and clinicians from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the University of Maryland Medical Center performed the first successful transplant of a genetically modified pig’s heart Friday to save his life, officials from the health system said Monday.
(Lloyd Fox)
Pig heart transplant
Dr. Bartley Griffith during the transplant on A Maryland man who is doing well after surgeons and clinicians from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the University of Maryland Medical Center performed the first successful transplant of a genetically modified pig’s heart Friday to save his life, officials from the health system said Monday.
Dr. Bartley Griffith during the transplant on A Maryland man who is doing well after surgeons and clinicians from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the University of Maryland Medical Center performed the first successful transplant of a genetically modified pig’s heart Friday to save his life, officials from the health system said Monday. (Mark Teske)
Dr. Bartley Griffith with 57-year-old David Bennett
A Maryland man is doing well after surgeons and clinicians from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the University of Maryland Medical Center performed the first successful transplant of a genetically modified pig’s heart Friday to save his life, officials from the health system said Monday. Dr. Bartley Griffith with 57-year-old David Bennett, who had been deemed ineligible for a conventional heart transplant at the University of Maryland Medical Center and other transplant centers around the country. Doctors will monitor him in the hospital over the next several weeks or months to ensure that his body doesn’t reject the new heart. Porcine heart transplants aren’t approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, but the federal agency authorized the surgery Dec. 31 under its “expanded access” provision. Sometimes called the “compassionate use” provision, it is used when other treatment or therapeutic options aren’t available.
A Maryland man is doing well after surgeons and clinicians from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the University of Maryland Medical Center performed the first successful transplant of a genetically modified pig’s heart Friday to save his life, officials from the health system said Monday. Dr. Bartley Griffith with 57-year-old David Bennett, who had been deemed ineligible for a conventional heart transplant at the University of Maryland Medical Center and other transplant centers around the country. Doctors will monitor him in the hospital over the next several weeks or months to ensure that his body doesn’t reject the new heart. Porcine heart transplants aren’t approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, but the federal agency authorized the surgery Dec. 31 under its “expanded access” provision. Sometimes called the “compassionate use” provision, it is used when other treatment or therapeutic options aren’t available. (Mark Teske)
Pig heart transplant
Doctors hold a pig heart that was transplanted into a Maryland man. The man is doing well after surgeons and clinicians from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the University of Maryland Medical Center performed the first successful transplant of a genetically modified pig’s heart Friday to save his life, officials from the health system said Monday.
Doctors hold a pig heart that was transplanted into a Maryland man. The man is doing well after surgeons and clinicians from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the University of Maryland Medical Center performed the first successful transplant of a genetically modified pig’s heart Friday to save his life, officials from the health system said Monday. (Mark Teske)
Pig heart transplant
A Maryland man is doing well after surgeons and clinicians from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the University of Maryland Medical Center performed the first successful transplant of a genetically modified pig’s heart Friday to save his life, officials from the health system said Monday.
A Maryland man is doing well after surgeons and clinicians from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the University of Maryland Medical Center performed the first successful transplant of a genetically modified pig’s heart Friday to save his life, officials from the health system said Monday. (Mark Teske)
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