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A long road has led to a 50th college reunion [Senior Circles]

Your 50th college reunion comes only once in a lifetime. I hope if yours is coming up soon that you attend.

At our Dunbarton College 50th Reunion Saturday evening dinner, classmate Rosemary O'Neill remarked, "Reunions such as this allow us to renew our friendships, like continuing a conversation that was interrupted five years earlier." This was the case for many of our classmates, whom we hadn't seen since graduation in 1965.

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In her "prayer" before Saturday's dinner, classmate Carol (Van Arnhem) O'Shaughnessy quoted a statistic that only six percent of women were college graduates in 1965. We have come a long way.

In her remarks at the Saturday Reunion Dinner, classmate Rosemary O'Neill, daughter of the late Tip O'Neill, U.S. House of Representatives, said, "The last few days have given us a lot of fodder over which to reminisce. When we went to Dunbarton, white pearls and white gloves were de rigueur. We bought our pillbox hats, pointed shoes and clutch bags at Woodies and Garfinkel's. Jackets were required for men. Tysons Corner was just a corner."

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O'Neill went on to say, "If Dunbarton taught us anything, it taught us to think and to write. We have lived on the cusp of global challenges: in communications, technology and health."

Eighteen members of the Class of 1965 have died. At the Sunday Mass we remembered them with a rose ceremony.

Ruth Dean, star staff writer for The Sunday Star in Washington, D.C., wrote two columns on the 1965 Dunbarton graduates, which appeared in the Society-Home section of the paper on May 30, 1965, the day after graduation.

The first article with the headline "Graduates" "Marriage Is a Career, Say Dunbarton Seniors." This headline was the result of a Star poll of 121 Dunbarton seniors. The questions asked were: "What career do you intend to follow? Will marriage interfere with that career?" Completed responses were received from 108 of the 121 seniors polled. The answers to the first question on career choices follow: Teacher, 45; Scientist, 10; Sociologist, 8; Businesswoman, 6; Government Girl, 4; Public Relations Consultant, 4; Data Processor, 4; Mathematician, 3; Librarian, 2; Artist, 2; Psychologist, 2; Journalist, 2; and Miscellaneous, 14. Responses to the second question were: No, 58; Yes, 23; and Other, 27.

The Most Rev. Patrick A. O'Boyle, Archbishop of Washington, presided at the graduation ceremony, held on the college hockey field. Sister Mildred Delores, C.S.C., college president, assisted the Archbishop.

The Dunbarton Class of 1965 experienced history during their four years in Washington. They were especially affected by the assassination of President John F. Kennedy (1963); and some of them marched on Washington for Civil Rights.

When Dunbarton College of the Holy Cross (1935-1973) closed in 1973 with the last graduation class, a Star-News article related that Rep. Thomas P. O'Neill Jr., then Majority Leader of the House of Representatives, told the graduates, that "the passing of Dunbarton College will not lessen the advances its graduates have made."

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