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U.N.I. Urgent Care Center a new medical option here [Clarksville]

Getting acquainted with a new Clarksville business is usually lots of fun. U.N.I. Urgent Care Center has been open for about four months. I've not needed their services, but others have and I've been getting glowing reports that led me to stop in for a get-acquainted visit.

People have actually reported that they had fun getting prompt, competent professional help in a clean, cheerful environment. That's saying a lot when you consider that these were unplanned medical emergencies being treated at odd hours.

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My first question was, "What does U.N.I. stand for?"

Dr. Jocelyn Apollon, medical director, simply had me repeat the letters. "You 'n' I are responsible for your health care."

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What will you find at the Urgent Care Center?

It has X-ray and lab on site. You can get travel vaccines not usually available in your regular doctor's office. If what started out as ordinary stomach flu has led to dehydration, you can get IV hydration. They provide occupational services for physicals, injuries or required tests in addition to sports injuries and other minor medical emergencies. They accept most insurance plans.

The Urgent Care Centers offer full-service, walk in professional treatment seven days a week for all ages. When your regular doctor can't see you, you can contact your Clarksville care center at http://www.uniurgentcare.com or call 443-656-0306 or just walk in. There are also U.N.I. Urgent Care Centers in Frederick, Westminster, Hagerstown and Columbia.

Oh, and Dr. Apollon is urging everyone to get a flu shot.

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What's coming up in Clarksville?

The first country breakfast of the season sponsored by the Fifth District Volunteer Fire Department is coming up on Sept. 14 from 8 a.m. until noon. Bring family and friends for pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, scrapple, apple sauce, breakfast beverages and more. No one should ever leave hungry. The cost is $9 for adults, $8 for seniors 55 and older, $5 for children 5-10 and free for little ones under age 5. Y'all come.

There is a Board of Education candidates forum scheduled on Sept. 17 beginning at 7 p.m. in the Other Barn in Oakland Mills Community Center. The sponsoring Columbia villages have invited Clarksville residents to attend. For more information, contact Oakland Mills Village Manager Sandy Cederbaum at 410-730-4610 or manager@oaklandmills.org.

Tammy Sutton, orchestra director at Dayton Oaks Elementary School, is offering music instruction for grades 3-5 on violin, viola, cello and bass. She notes that free instruction is available in Howard County through grade 12. "Learning to play a string instrument and belonging to the school orchestra opens up a whole new world of learning, friendship and fun. Students learn self-discipline, group cooperation, problem-solving, goal-setting, self-expression and the importance of teamwork — skills in great demand in life. Like all arts, music has a profound effect on the academic success of students."

String classes at Dayton Oaks begin Sept. 22.

Pointers Run Elementary was buzzing with excitement recently when Howard County Executive Ken Ulman helped launch the first-in-the-county school-based food scrap collection program. This program is the direct result of advocacy and the initiative of last year's fourth grade class.

Many of the students participate in a composting program at home. They wanted the school to participate. Last spring students in Deborah Hantman's fourth grade class wrote a series of persuasive letters to officials asking for the composting program. Ms. Hantmand wrote, "It would be great if the students could get some kind of response so they know their letters were received and that they have the power to make a difference."

It worked. Scraps will be collected twice a week to go to the composting facility at the landfill. It costs less to process compost that can be sold for useful purposes than to process trash into the landfill. It's a win for everyone and students learned they can make a difference if they set their minds to it and act.

They've set a good example for all citizens. Way to go, kids.

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