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Howard roads reopen, power restored after tornado ripped through Glenelg last week

A crew with J&B Tree Service cuts up a tree entangled in power lines along Linthicum Road in Dayton on Friday, a day after a tornado moved through the area.
A crew with J&B Tree Service cuts up a tree entangled in power lines along Linthicum Road in Dayton on Friday, a day after a tornado moved through the area. (Jerry Jackson / Baltimore Sun)

Roads have reopened and power has been restored to thousands of customers after Howard County saw an EF-1 tornado for the second time in two weeks.

Thursday’s tornado, which ranked second mildest on the Enhanced Fujita Scale, had a maximum width of 100 yards and peak winds of 100 mph. It touched down at 3:20 p.m. and traveled seven minutes for 4.5 miles in the Glenelg area of Howard County, according to the National Weather Service.

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After touching down in a residential community between Meriweather Drive and Edgewoods Way, the tornado “ripped sections of roofing decks off homes,” took down power lines and uprooted trees, NWS wrote Monday.

The storm caused widespread power outages and the tornado ripped off the tin roofing and “destroyed garage bay doors” at a Howard County Highway Maintenance Facility off Route 32, the NWS said.

It ripped off a section of barn roofing as it traveled through residential areas along Bucksin Lake Drive, Folly Quarter Lane and Heritage Hill Lane before it lifted at 3:27 p.m, the service wrote.

No injuries or deaths were reported.

Some Howard schools, including Folly Quarter Middle and Clarksville Middle, were closed Friday because of the loss of power.

Nearly 3,000 homes lost power and more than 30 roads were closed. Baltimore Gas and Electric Company restored service by Friday night for the majority of Howard County customers who lost power during the storm, according to Nick Alexopulos, a spokesman for the company. The remainder had power restored by midday Saturday.

Howard County dispatched 60 people to clear debris, according to Kris Jagarapu, deputy chief of the Bureau of Highways. All roads were reopened by Monday morning.

An EF-1 tornado struck the Clarksville area May 23 and swept into Columbia. This year is already the state’s most active for tornadoes since 2013, with five being reported so far. There have been more than 1,000 tornadoes across the country this year — the third most since 2005, behind only 2008 and 2011, according to the Storm Prediction Center.

Baltimore Sun reporters Meredith Cohn, Scott Dance and Phil Davis contributed to this article.

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