xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

For Columbia photographers, beauty can be found everywhere

Jerry Gettleman, "Orchid #1"
Jerry Gettleman, "Orchid #1" (Courtesy photo / Bernice Kish Gallery)

The Columbia Photo Artists’ exhibit “Diverse Perspectives” at the Bernice Kish Gallery at Slayton House is true to its title. Some of these photographers stick close to home, while others venture abroad. The diversity of subject matter encompasses panoramic landscapes, floral close-ups, architecture and whatever else prompts them to raise a camera.

Among those who only need to travel as far as the historic district in Ellicott City for inspiration is Ann C. Eid. Her “Ellicott City — October” features a single store as seen from Main Street. Eid's more complex photographic composition “Ellicott City” features multiple reflections in an antiques-filled store window.

Advertisement

Harriet Rosenberg’s “Main Street, Ellicott City” uses a stone arch as the framing device through which we can see the iconic clock and other familiar structures at the lower end of the street.

If those Main Street locations qualify as being a short drive away, other photographers in this show needed a passport to reach their locations. Their assorted destinations give viewers a chance to see different landscapes and structures around the world.

Advertisement

Jerry Weinstein’s “Dubrovnik Castle” calls attention to a structure so old that it seems like it exists in a fairy tale, whereas David Zeitzer’s “Iceland Church” features a sleek modernist structure with bell tower that stands out against an austere landscape.

Some of the other architecturally oriented photographs in the show focus on tightly framed details rather than entire structures.

Howard Community College opened its doors in 1970, the 14th community college in the state of Maryland. April is National Community College Month.

Weinstein’s “A Castle Handrail” emphasizes the ornate design found in the smallest architectural components of much larger structures.

Modern structures that get a close-up examination include Roderick Barr’s “Door to Nowhere,” in which a sharply angled interior corridor makes you wonder what, if anything, is behind a door at the back of the corridor.

Somewhat similar interiors are explored by Bruce Blum in “Curved Wall with Shadows,” in which shadows play across the surface of a staircase and its railing; and Blum’s “Fountain,” in which a functional object as mundane as a wall-mounted water fountain becomes an artistic study in how light glistens and shadows are cast against a wall.

Getting away from the built environment and out into the natural world, a number of photographers find beauty wherever they go. Floral subjects range from an “Orchid” series by Jerry Gettleman to Joan Forester’s seasonally apt “Cherry Blossoms.”

Although people are seen enjoying nature in Dennis Gilbert’s “Friends at Sunset,” it seems appropriate the four silhouetted figures standing on a pier are are tiny relative to the watery environment around them.

Gilbert’s interest in varied light levels and reflections also can be seen in “Gentle Waves at Dawn,” which establishes a reflective mood; and “Converging Reflections,” in which the sky is reflected in the sea.

Columbia Photo Artists’ exhibit “Diverse Perspectives” runs through May 4 at the Bernice Kish Gallery at Slayton House, 10400 Cross Fox Lane in Columbia.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement