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River Hill grad’s mask-making becomes a business | Clarksville

Recent River Hill graduate Emma Golus, of Clarksville, saw an opportunity to make face coverings fashionable as well as functional. She started Coronavirus Couture to provide reusable cotton masks for the community.
Recent River Hill graduate Emma Golus, of Clarksville, saw an opportunity to make face coverings fashionable as well as functional. She started Coronavirus Couture to provide reusable cotton masks for the community. (HANDOUT)

As masks have become a routine part of daily life, recent River Hill graduate Emma Golus saw an opportunity to make the face coverings fashionable as well as functional. She started Coronavirus Couture to provide reusable cotton masks for the community.

Golus started making masks with her mother, who is a health care worker, back in March in case the hospital where she works ran out of supplies. Initially, the duo only sold to family and friends but when Emma saw a need in the larger community, she branched out and started her own mask-making business.

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“At the end of the day, I want people to have masks that fit well and are both stylish and affordable, so they can protect themselves and others,” Golus said. “I’ve been making pleated masks with two layers of cotton in three different sizes (kids, adult and large adult), and all of the masks include a nose piece and a filter pocket.”

Most of the mask business is custom work by request, but Golus has recently started selling outside of Kendall Hardware and at the Old Ellicott City Labor Day Sidewalk Sale. She also sells via the online maker community Etsy at coronaviruscouture.etsy.com. She estimates that she has sold over 500 masks in the past six months.

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“I think it has been a great way to give back to the community and keep everyone safe. I was also able to learn skills along the way, like communication and organization, that will help me in college and beyond,” Golus said. “Ultimately, I think this has been a positive experience that not only allowed me to better myself, but to better my community.”

Golus is a freshman at the University of Delaware, where she is majoring in health behavior science. She has been sewing since she was in fourth grade. Her past projects included making pillows and quilts.

Masks are one for $10 or two for $15. Golus can be reached at coronaviruscouture@gmail.com.

The St. Louis Concert Series returns for its 15th season with “Bells Are Ringing” at 4 p.m. Oct. 4. The concert welcomes Emmy-nominated Spanish-American composer, pianist and recording artist Gabriel Ruiz-Bernal and soprano Colleen Daly Eberhardt. The performance will include Ruiz-Bernal’s original musical setting of Edgar Allan Poe’s poem “The Bells.” The piece will feature the church’s new carillon and refurbished bell tower.

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Daly Eberhardt was recently named the third artistic director of the concert series. The professional singer has appeared with opera houses, symphony orchestras and choral societies throughout the United States and Canada. In addition to juggling her opera career, private voice studio and motherhood, Eberhardt is navigating church, local and state COVID guidelines to resume live musical performances in a safe manner.

A limited number of tickets are available for socially distanced attendance in the church. The concert also will be broadcast online. Learn how to attend or view the show at stlconcertseries.org.

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