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Letters: Howard residents should work together to combat climate change; and more from readers

We should work together to combat climate change

The issue of climate change, diffuse in time and space, is often difficult to grasp. How do we act on such an immense issue? It can feel like trying to change the future of humanity.

The truth is that regardless of what we do, we are contributing to the future of humanity. Our everyday actions can shape the course of our civilization when we integrate the need for climate action into our lives.

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I saw this recently in a community meeting at the First Presbyterian Church of Howard County, attended by people in every decade of life from teens to 80s. Among them were a young lady bringing her parents along to learn about climate action and two different young fathers, dedicating their time and money toward climate action for their toddlers. A retired physicist was gathering support for a “Straw Witch Brew Crew” to engage local breweries in endorsing federal bipartisan climate legislation that will tackle climate change and local economic growth.

Gatherings like this, where people learn from and are inspired by each other to work on climate action, provide the chance to strengthen community while working for national climate legislation.

Changes will occur whether we want them or not. Why not be part of the positive change you want for your family and community, by coming together to learn and take action for stronger communities that are less dependent on fossil fuels?

Sabrina S. Fu

Ellicott City

Where is the separation of church and state?

It is astounding to me that ignoring the separation of church and state is apparently so easily accepted (“Department of Justice supporting Christian academy’s lawsuit over Maryland voucher program,” Dec. 5). Why is the Constitution, which specifies the separation of church and state, being so easily ignored?

The focus of this article does not even touch on this basic issue, but rather only questions whether the tax-funded religious schools should have to accommodate and cater to religious beliefs.

All the money currently being spent on private and religious schools should instead be spent on public schools, who are required to take all students, instead of being allowed, like private and religious schools, to discriminate against any student needing extra help.

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Doris Rausch

Columbia

Respect those who truly need handicapped parking

As the holiday season approaches, we hear messages of love and good will to all men (and women, hopefully).

One way to extend these good wishes to all would be to allow the truly handicapped to park in the spaces that are allocated for them. As someone with a family member who needs these spaces, I have observed that they are frequently being occupied by those who could easily park elsewhere.

Please note that if you are driving the family car and the handicapped person is not with you, you are not eligible to park in a handicapped zone. Also, a handicapped parking spot should never be used as a quick place to park for takeout at a restaurant or while waiting to pick up someone. If you are legally parking in a handicapped spot but are able to walk easily to your destination, it would be kind to allow a truly handicapped person take that spot.

The striped area in between handicapped parking spaces is not a parking space and should be left empty so that the handicapped person can access the vehicle.

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Parking before and during the holidays can be frustrating. Please don’t make it impossible for those who are not as blessed as you are.

Marlene Kellett

Columbia

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