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Letters: The postal service is a testament to unshakable human spirit; more from readers | READER COMMENTARY

USPS is testament to human spirit

With all the gnashing of teeth over the failures of the United States Postal Service, I frantically walked outside to make sure our neighborhood mailbox was still at its proper place on the corner. I breathed a sigh of relief when I saw the blue box was still standing, a reassuring beacon in a collapsing world.

The growing politicization of the mail prompted me to dig up a couple of upbeat tidbits about this (mostly) revered institution. Both were revitalizing and renewing, a testament to the unshakable human spirit.

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In the children’s book, “The Great San Francisco Earthquake,” of 1906, I learned the post office was only one of a handful of buildings in the center of the city by the bay that hadn’t been pulverized in the temblor and fire. “The brave post office workers fought off the fires day and night,” the author writes. Miraculously, only two days later, they were sending out mail again.

Postmaster General Louis DeJoy, I think, would be better suited as President Donald Trump’s timekeeper overseeing TikTok. Like the shivering masses in Times Square on New Year’s Eve, he can count down the seconds his boss has left before deservedly being booted from public housing.

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Tony Glaros

Wilde Lake

Tony Glaros is a freelance writer who has previously contributed to the Howard County Times/Columbia Flier.

Howard County needs to end its contract with ICE

Many other counties in Maryland have reduced or cut off contracts with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, an agency that has treated men, women and children inhumanely in its operations around the country. Howard County has stubbornly continued its contract with ICE to house immigration detainees in the Howard County Detention Center.

We are, however, fortunate there are principled Howard County Council members like Liz Walsh, who introduced a bill to stop housing men at the Howard County Detention Center. But where are our formerly passionate human rights advocates like County Executive Calvin Ball, who has resisted this proposal for over a year? Where is my representative, Opel Jones, who does not even respond to calls or letters on this subject, much less take a supportive position?

Having campaigned for Ball and Jones, their silence is surprising and disappointing to me. I hope they will return to supporting the values of human rights for all, including the men incarcerated by ICE in Jessup, most of whom are Black or Latino.

Roslyn Zinner

Columbia

Editor’s note: On Friday, Howard County updated its policy with ICE to only house immigration detainees who are convicted of a “crime of violence,” such as murder, rape or kidnapping.

Living as a Black person in America

First of all, Richard Briggs, a huge Rolling Stones fan, needs to put the pipe down (“Pessimism on future progress on race issues,” Sept. 10). Not sure whether it’s the haze or simply his total ignorance of American history, its sordid past and the residue it has weaved and entrenched in the very fabric and foundation of this country. To label my comments in a recent letter to the editor as racist is not only ludicrous but justifies the very positions I take on race.

Mr. Briggs’ “lack of imagination” or interest will never allow him to address, for a minute, what it’s like to live as a Black person in America. The vast majority of white people have never felt the need to be curious about how we live and I’m sure he’s one. We know all about them thanks to the sanitized version of “American” history we learned in public schools from kindergarten to the 12th grade. Or, as I like to call it, “his story.”

We had to know white people to survive white people — slavery, reconstruction, Jim Crow, Ku Klux Klan intimidation, lynchings, and sanctioned state and government policies specifically designed to thwart Black advancement. We managed to survive that but, unquestionably, as Frederick Douglass said, “The struggle continues” to this very day.

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I can only wonder if Mr. Briggs objects to NFL players kneeling during the national anthem in their opposition to police brutality and social injustice. “It’s Sunday, it’s one o’clock, the grill’s hot, the beer’s cold and the guys are coming over — please, I don’t want to deal with any social issues on a Sunday afternoon!” The problem is far too many white people don’t want to deal with them on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday or Saturday, for that matter.

So when Mr. Briggs has to worry about jogging while white, listening to loud music while white, driving while white, bird-watching while white, barbecuing while white, having that talk with your son about interacting with the police while white, perhaps we can have a conversation. In closing, progress on race, trust me, will never happen with the idiot we currently have in the White House and those who support him.

Walt Carr

Columbia

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