xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Letters: We must stand against hate in Howard County; more from readers | READER COMMENTARY

We must speak up and speak out against hate

The Howard County Human Rights Commission condemns recent hateful acts, in Howard County and throughout the country, against the Asian American and Pacific Islander, Hispanic and Latino, immigrant, and Black and African American communities.

As an organization, we are committed to creating a county where the human rights of all are respected and protected. Our mission is to cultivate a community where the ideals of equity, inclusion, respect and nondiscrimination are interwoven into everyday life.

Advertisement

During the past year, there has been a documented increase of hateful acts, including verbal harassment and physical assault, against the Asian American and Pacific Islander community. On Feb. 11, six businesses — four of them Asian-owned — in Howard County were burglarized at the start of the Lunar New Year. On March 4, an individual directed discriminatory and hateful comments toward Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, Hispanic and Latino Americans, and immigrants during a meeting of the Howard County Racial Equity Task Force.

In addition, on March 16, eight people, six of them Asian women, were killed in shootings at spas in Atlanta, Georgia. We are saddened by this loss and assure the members of Howard County’s Asian American and Pacific Islander community, as well as members of the Hispanic and Latino American and immigrant communities, that the Howard County Human Rights Commission stands in solidarity with them.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Hate-bias incidents continue to affect others, as well. On March 13, the marquee sign at Glenwood Middle School was vandalized by spray-painting over the word “Black” in the statement “Black Lives Matter” (“Howard County police investigating racist vandalism at Glenwood Middle School,” March 15). This vandalism, which is being investigated as a hate crime, continues a nationwide trend of hateful acts directed against the Black and African American community. The Howard County Human Rights Commission supports members of Howard County’s Black and African American community in denouncing this act.

We join countless others in condemning these and other acts of hate. We ask our fellow residents to exhibit compassion and support for all of their neighbors – regardless of race, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, age, disabilities or gender identity – including members of the most recently targeted Asian American and Pacific Islander, Hispanic and Latino, immigrant, and Black and African American communities, many of whom are living in fear.

Kindness is very powerful. We must speak up and speak out against hate and all types of aggression no matter where it exists, whom it targets, or what form it takes. Our unity in this regard shall overcome these terrible acts.

Scott B. Markow

Advertisement

The writer is the chair of the Howard County Human Rights Commission.

Ending ICE contract shows respect for immigrants

On March 19, Howard County made a huge step forward to ensure justice for all its residents (“Howard County ends contract with ICE that allowed immigration detainees to be housed at detention center,” March 23). County Executive Calvin Ball ended the long-held contract with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, ending the detention of immigrants in the county detention center.

In this time of mounting attacks on immigrants and citizens of Asian origin, County Executive Ball’s action sends out a strong message that Howard County respects and welcomes people from all countries. Immigrants make up more than 20% of Howard County’s population. They deserve the same rights and privileges as other residents. And they deserve to live without fear of arrest and deportation.

Laurie Liskin

Ellicott City

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement