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Three council incumbents to face one challenger, mayor unopposed so far in Havre de Grace election

The three incumbent Havre de Grace City Council members will face at least one challenger in May’s election — Kirk Smith filed last week to run.

Also filing was Councilman David Martin, who is seeking his third term. He joins incumbents Jason Robertson and Carolyn Zinner on the ballot.

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Mayor William T. Martin is seeking his third term as mayor; no one yet has filed to run against him.

The filing period closes at 5 p.m. Tuesday.

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Candidates for mayor and City Council must be at least 25 years old; a citizen of the United States for at least 10 years preceding the election; a qualified city voter at the time of filing; and a resident of Havre de Grace for at least two years preceding the election date.

The filing fee for mayor is $100 and City Council is $50.

The Havre de Grace mayor and two of three council members say they plan to seek re-election this spring.

Qualified candidates can file a notice of candidacy with the director of administration at City Hall, 711 Pennington Ave.

Smith, who finished sixth in a field of seven candidates in last year’s election, said his campaign is about “preserving our natural areas, about community sustainability and sustainable development.”

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“A vote for me is a vote for a tree,” Smith said.

“I believe this city needs a better sustainability program than what we have,” he said. “We need a huge increase in what we test for in our drinking water.”

An environmental person at heart, he realizes the city needs sustainable development. But with an increase in rain, up the Interstate 95 corridor and into Pennsylvania, “that stuff is being washed out.”

“It’s all coming downriver, and that’s the source of 100 percent of Havre de Grace’s drinking water and good chunk of Harford County’s drinking water,” said Smith, who moved to Havre de Grace in 2010.

With an increase in fracking in Pennsylvania, the chemicals injected into the water then go into the ground, he said, then into the river and the city’s drinking water.

“I think we need to be testing for whatever chemicals,” he said.

Robertson is running for his second term and Zinner for her first full term. She was appointed in November to fill the remaining term of Monica Worrell.

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