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As questions about President Donald Trump's association with Russia persist, leaders of a small city right on its border will visit Harford County this week and talk will about their constant fear of Russia retaking control of their country.

The mayor and deputy mayor of Narva, the third-largest city in Estonia and the easternmost city in the country, will be visiting their sister city, the Town of Bel Air.

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Estonia was under the control of the Soviet Union from 1940, during World War II, until the breakup of the USSR, gaining full independence in 1991.

"They're under constant fear that Russia one day will decide to cross their borders and take control again," Town Administrator Jesse Bane said. "We'll hear straight from the horse's mouth what it's like to live on the Russian border."

During their visit, Mayor Tarmo Tammiste and Vice Mayor Slava Konovalov, of Narva, Estonia, Secretary of Political Affairs Kristjan Kuurme, of the Estonian Embassy and Director Karl Altau, of Joint Baltic American National Committee, will be part of a panel discussion on Tuesday in Room 132 of Harford Community College's Edgewood Hall, where they'll discuss "Living on the Russian Border." The free event begins at 7 p.m.

In addition to the college, they also will visit Upper Chesapeake Medical Center and the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground.

"This is a big celebration for the Town of Bel Air," Mayor Susan Burdette told the Board of Town Commissioners last week. "It's a very, very small town, with very interesting people who are very proud of the Town of Bel Air."

With a population of 58,000 and an area of 32 square miles, Narva has almost six times as many residents as Bel Air and is significantly larger. Much of the city was destroyed during World War II.

In a Skype session on April 2, 2014, Bel Air and the City of Narva in the Republic of Estonia signed a sister city agreement that "commits the two cities to work together by providing opportunities to discuss plans for future exchanges and cooperation in every field like economy, trade and government," according to a proclamation declaring June 2-4 to be Days of Narva.

Student Achievement Awards

The town commissions recognized two students, Peyton Peverley and Zachary Huber, with 2017 Student Achievement Awards during the most recent town meeting on May 15.

Peyton "embodies the heart and spirit of Harford Day School's mission," according to the proclamation presented to her.

Peyton Peverley, front row right, a student at Harford Day School, is honored by Bel Air town commissioners Susan Burdette, front row left, and back row from left, Brendan Hopkins, Patrick Richards, Robert Preston and Philip Einhorn with a 2017 Student Achievement Award.
Peyton Peverley, front row right, a student at Harford Day School, is honored by Bel Air town commissioners Susan Burdette, front row left, and back row from left, Brendan Hopkins, Patrick Richards, Robert Preston and Philip Einhorn with a 2017 Student Achievement Award. (Courtesy of Michael Krantz / Handout)

"Peyton's dedication, hard work and honest effort shine through in everything she touches," it reads.

Her teachers say she has a diligent work ethic, "amazing" organizational abilities and kindness toward other classmates. She's independent, imaginative and responsible.

"If you need a task accomplished, Peyton is the 'go-to' girl. If a fellow classmate needs assistance, Peyton is the first to lend a hand," according to the proclamation.

Zachary Huber, front row right, a student at St. Margaret School, is honored by Bel Air town commissioners Susan Burdette, front row left, and back row from left, Brendan Hopkins, Patrick Richards, Robert Preston and Philip Einhorn with a 2017 Student Achievement Award.
Zachary Huber, front row right, a student at St. Margaret School, is honored by Bel Air town commissioners Susan Burdette, front row left, and back row from left, Brendan Hopkins, Patrick Richards, Robert Preston and Philip Einhorn with a 2017 Student Achievement Award. (Courtesy of Michael Krantz / Handout)

Zachary is a natural leader in school and outside. At St. Margaret School, he takes his responsibility as a member of the Flag Team very seriously, according to the proclamation presented him.

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He arrives at school earlier than his classmates to raise the flag. He makes sure it comes down, depending on the weather and flown at half-staff when mandated.

Zac recently moved from Cub Scouts to Boy Scout Troop 564 and hopes to become an Eagle Scout.

His responsibilities carry into his faith. He has been altar server for two years, serving during weekly Masses and during weekend parish Masses.

He is described as responsible, respectful, thoughtful and enthusiastic.



Harford County’s “Choose Civility” campaign kicked off with a breakfast event at the Water’s Edge Events Center in Belcamp on Wednesday.
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