xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Craig out as state planning chief, will head World War I Centennial Commission

Former Havre de Grace Mayor and Harford County Executive David Craig, shown speaking at the Havre de Grace Library dedication June 15, is stepping down as state planning secretary next month to head the Maryland World War I Centennial Commission.
Former Havre de Grace Mayor and Harford County Executive David Craig, shown speaking at the Havre de Grace Library dedication June 15, is stepping down as state planning secretary next month to head the Maryland World War I Centennial Commission. (MATT BUTTON | AEGIS STAFF / Baltimore Sun)

Former Harford County executive David Craig is stepping down as the state's secretary of planning next month to head the Maryland World War I Centennial Commission, Gov. Larry Hogan announced Friday.

Craig, 67, a Havre de Grace resident who has headed the state department of planning since early 2015, will be succeeded in the cabinet level post by Wendi Peters, who currently serves as deputy secretary of the department.

Advertisement

"I would like to thank David for his service at the Department of Planning and wish him well in his new leadership role of this historic commission," Hogan said in a statement. "Over the past 18 months, David has built a strong foundation for the department, and I am confident that Wendi will continue to effectively lead the department in her new position."

Craig couldn't immediately be reached for comment. In a statement released with the governor's announcement, he said: "I was both honored and humbled to serve as the secretary of Planning. I look forward to continuing to serve the Hogan administration by helping the governor recognize Maryland's significant role in World War I."

Advertisement

According to the governor's announcement, in his new role, Craig will be responsible for developing and executing plans for projects and activities recognizing the 100th anniversary of World War I. The World War I Commission, which was established on November 11, 2015 and consists of up to 11 members, will present an action plan to the governor by June 30, 2017.

The announcement notes that Craig has a background in education spanning more than 30 years, 15 of which was spent as a history teacher. "An avid historian and published author, Craig developed a love of World War I at an early age," the announcement states.

"I was both honored and humbled to serve as the secretary of Planning," said Secretary Craig. "I look forward to continuing to serve the Hogan administration by helping the governor recognize Maryland's significant role in World War I." In his position as planning secretary, Craig also headed the Maryland Historical Trust.

Craig will be paid $110,279 a year in his new post, which is a full-time postion, Hogan spokesperson Shareese DeLeaver-Churchill said. As planning secretary he has been making $135,048.

A Republican, as is the governor, Craig lost to Hogan in the 2014 Republican gubernatorial primary election. Craig served a record nine and a half years as Harford's chief executive from July 2005 to December 2014. He has also served as mayor of Havre de Grace, a member of the House of Delegates and a member of the State Senate.

Craig represented the governor at the June 15 dedication of the new Havre de Grace Library, a project that was begun during his final term as county executive.

Several members of Craig's Harford County staff followed him into state government in the Hogan administration.

Prior to her position as deputy secretary, Peters was a paralegal at Boer Kale. Peters was elected to the Mount Airy Town Council in 2004, the first woman to serve two terms when she was re-elected in 2008. Peters has a history in both public and community service, including involvement in several groups such as the Mount Airy Main Street Association and Mount Airy Historical Society.

Both appointments will take effect July 6.

Aegis staff member David Anderson contributed to this report.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement