Strider Denison, with Comcast for four years, and Jason Bell, a former Comcast employee, work on a handicap accessible flowerbed at the Bear Legacy Adventure Trail Saturday during Comcast Cares Day.
Strider Denison, with Comcast for four years, and Jason Bell, a former Comcast employee, work on a handicap accessible flowerbed at the Bear Legacy Adventure Trail Saturday during Comcast Cares Day. (Erika Butler/The Aegis)

More than 250 people, about half of whom were Comcast employees, spent Saturday morning traipsing through the woods, building obstacles on the Bear Legacy Adventure Trail.

It was part of Comcast Cares Day, one of the largest single day volunteer events in the country, though this year the projects can be done over a six-week period, Brad Biggs, who’s with Comcast in Fallston, said. The telecommunications giant has hosted the Comcast Cares event for 18 years, engaging more than 1 million volunteers in projects across the nation.

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Comcast employees returned to the trail at the intersection of Wheel Road and Route 24 for a second year to help fulfill the vision of Patrick and Stacy Brzozowski, who are creating the trail in memory of their son, Bear, who died in 2013 at the age of 5.

The trail, at the site of the Maryland Center for the Arts site, is about 1.5 miles around the outer edge with shorter trails throughout the inside. Along the way are some obstacles for kids to play on, “Floor is Lava” and “Den Dash” along the Storybook Trail, “Leapin’ Lizards” along the outside and a ropes course and a platform for outdoor group yoga.

Two years ago, Biggs was at the site with Stacy Brzozowski and they saw kids playing in the woods.

“I could see the potential for people in Harford County to spend a free afternoon here, playing in the woods,” Biggs, who lives in Bel Air, said. “We kind of fell in love with Stacy’s ideas, really her vision for what she sees out here.”

Others joined Comcast in their efforts Saturday, including Hickory International, Maryland Portable Concrete, Hall’s Honey Pots, Comer Construction and Italian Sensations, which donated materials and food.

The trail project is ever-evolving, he said, with unlimited potential on 41 acres.

Niki Biggs, Brad Biggs’ wife, and Amber Pinder, a Comcast employee, were working on Bears Band, a collection of household items that can be used to make music.

It was Pinder’s first year working on the trail.

“It’s awesome it’s our second year coming back and it’s just going to get bigger and better,” Pinder said. “It will be nice to watch it progress over time.”

Jason Bell and Strider Denison were measuring a 10-foot piece of wood as they made a wheelchair accessible stand in front of Bears Band.

Bell is a former Comcast employee who comes back for Comcast Cares Day to show his support.

“I am thrilled with this project. It’s a great area that keeps getting better and has more to offer kids of all ages,” Bell said.

Denison has worked for Comcast for four years and was excited to be able to help with the trail project.

“Last year was a lot of trimming woods, this year we’re really building it out,” Denison said.

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Patrick Brzozowski was helping with the Floor is Lava obstacle, said it was “awesome” to see “the community come together and give support to our cause.”

“Two years ago we never thought this would happen,” Brzozowski said.

His son, Bear, is never far from his thoughts, Brzozowski said.

“I could just see him running through the woods having a good time, enjoying this. He’d give us a thumbs up,” Brzozowski said. “The kids playing, having a good time, it makes me think of him. All this is because of him. It’s just awesome.”

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