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Volunteers needed to help clean up Bosely Conservancy at Anita Leight Saturday

Bags of trash are filled during a previous cleanup of Bosely Conservancy in Edgewood. Another cleanup is scheduled for Saturday, March 23.
Bags of trash are filled during a previous cleanup of Bosely Conservancy in Edgewood. Another cleanup is scheduled for Saturday, March 23. (Aegis file photo)

Nearly two tons of trash were cleaned up from the Bosely Conservancy watershed, in addition to 840 pounds of recyclable materials and 116 tires last year.

Volunteers will be cleaning up the 350-acre privately owned wetland again this year, with cleanup scheduled from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday.

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“We welcome volunteers,” said Bryon Bodt, a board member of the Isaak Walton League of America, which owns the conservancy. “We’re doing this not only to enhance our own property where we have people coming to recreate, we’re also a stopping point to keep stuff from going farther out in to the [Chesapeake] Bay and ocean.”

The conservancy serves the watershed of Winters Run, one of the largest completely contained waterways in Harford County, 50 to 55 square miles that extend from Jarrettsville south to Route 7 in Edgewood, where the waterway changes to Otter Point Creek, Bodt said.

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“It gets all the debris and trash that may fall into the water from all over that whole watershed, deposited in our marsh,” he said. “Some makes its way through, especially how much it rained last year, some is pushed all the way through.”

The more volunteers who participate, the more trash they’ll be able to clean up, Bodt said. Typically the cleanup draws 70 to 100 volunteers, depending on the weather.

“Any cleanup like this is welcome,” Cindy Mumby, spokesperson for Harford County Government, said. “The county is certainly supportive of any effort to clean up the natural environment.”

Most of the volunteers will be on foot picking up trash. Accessibility to some areas will be dictated by the height of the water on Saturday, as well.

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Some places will present more of a challenge than others, such as riverlets and small creeks. There are also some trails that will be reserved for the younger participants.

“We don’t want them close to the creeks and we want them to be successful,” Bodt said.

The watershed is the only natural area in Harford County, he said, which means it’s an area designated with significant wildlife and plants native to the area and a good spot for the public to view such things.

The cleanup serves two purposes, he said.

“The main purpose is to clean up,” Bodt said. “Secondary is to educate folks so they make wise choices, so they don’t throw out stuff along our roads that eventually end up in our watersheds and our waterways.”

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