xml:space="preserve">

As taken from the pages of The Aegis dated Thursday, February 13, 1964:

It was announced 50 years ago that Rev. Raymond Wanner, the assistant pastor at St. Margaret's Church in Bel Air since 1959, would be the first principal of John Carroll School when it opened in September 1964. The Archbishop of Baltimore Lawrence Shehan also announced that the new school would be named John Carroll in memory of Archbishop John Carroll, the first Archbishop of Baltimore and the first member of the United States Hierarchy.

Advertisement

An enforcement program was being designed to catch up with motorists who were ignoring the toll payment on the new Northeastern Expressway. The Expressway State Police were trying to give the program publicity before issuing any summons for neglecting to pay at the toll booths. Many patrons had taken advantage of the fact that the tolls were unmanned and proceeded through these areas despite flashing red lights. The initial action in the enforcement program was to consist of warnings being issued. The penalty for failing to deposit the toll could be from $1 to $100.

The Baltimore City Health Department closed five Harford County dairy farms when a spray residue, heptachlor, was found in their milk. Farmers applied heptachlor to their hay fields in the fall of the year as an insecticide and the residue disappeared before the crop was harvested. If a cow ate contaminated hay, it was stored in the fatty tissues of their bodies and released in the milk. The residue was discharged in the milk for several weeks after the cow's diet was changed to spray free hay. The spray residue was not found in amounts felt harmful to humans but the dairymen were advised to dump out their milk and to make no attempt to salvage it.

J. Davis Jeweler, owned and operated by the Davis family of Havre de Grace, would be closing its doors after 74 years in business on Washington Street. In 1890, Jacob Davis moved to Havre de Grace and opened a small shop doing watch and clock repairs. In April 1900 he moved the business to 142 N. Washington St.

In 1918, Joseph Davis, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Davis, was the first Havre de Grace soldier killed in World Ware I and the American Legion post was named in his honor. Jacob Davis was both a Havre de Grace City councilman as well as council president and was a charter member of the city's Rotary Club. He died in 1936 and the business was continued by his wife, Katherine, until her death in 1948. The management following Mrs. Davis' death fell to Abe Davis, who served as a county commissioner for two full terms and three terms as chairman of the Board of County Commissioners. Until the end of February 1964, the store was having a sale to get rid of all of the merchandise before closing its doors for a final time.

Edgewood High School students conducted a boycott of their lunches by not eating the food from the school's cafeteria. The boycott was a maneuver to help them obtain certain events at the school which the students felt had not been held this year at a pace with other schools in the county. The students included in their requests: more assemblies, more dances, more pre-game pep rallies and an investigation into why a lighting system had not yet been put up for the football field. These matters were scheduled to be discussed at a meeting of the Edgewood PTA.

More than 400 people visited the grand opening of Joseph "Pepi" Simmeth's new meat products store on Thomas Street in Bel Air 50 years ago. To add to the excitement of the weekend, their German born butcher, Henri Arzt, accidentally cut his wrist severely with a sharp knife. The man was taken by the Bel Air Fire Department to the hospital for treatment.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement