xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement

Harford Chabad celebrates Hanukkah with celebrations big and small

Rabbi Kushi Schusterman lights the 6-foot Lego-style menorah created by yougsters at Harford Chabad as part of the organization's commemoration of the Hannukah season.
Rabbi Kushi Schusterman lights the 6-foot Lego-style menorah created by yougsters at Harford Chabad as part of the organization's commemoration of the Hannukah season.(Handout)

A 6-foot Lego-style menorah and a “latkes and vodkas” event were among the ways Harford Chabad greeted Hannukah.

Hannukah, of the Festival of Lights, started Dec. 2 and continues through Monday.

Advertisement

Harford Chabad, on North Bond Street in Bel Air, started Hanukkah events last weekend with the Saturday evening latkes and vodkas event — a gathering where community members got a chance to socialize and pick up a menorah and candles, as well as share camaraderie and friendship.

The Bel Air Lions Club will get its final shipment of Christmas trees Saturday morning, and once they’re gone there won’t be any more.

Sunday was the ninth annual menorah lighting in Shamrock Park, following the Christmas parade, with close to 100 attendees, according to Rabbi Kushi Schusterman. County Councilman Tony Giangiordano lit the center candle and parade chairman Michael Blum chanted traditional blessings and lit the first candle, according to a release from the rabbi.

Also Sunday, the Chabad teen group celebrated with its own event, and on Monday youth members built their own Lego-style menorah.

In the press release, Schusterman noted that Bel Air Mayor Susan Burdette lit the town menorah Monday night, with Bel Air Police Chief Moore, Town Administrator Jesse Bane and some town commissioners in attendance.

Havre de Grace’s downtown is lit up for the Christmas holiday and will ring in the season tonight with the annual parade and tree-lighting during Holly Jolly First Fridays.

The Menorah lighting is part of the worldwide Hanukkah campaign highlighting and encouraging the central theme of the holiday.

“The message of Hanukkah is the message of light and humility,” Schusterman said. “The nature of light is that it is always victorious over darkness. And while the light of the menorah starts at home, it shines to the community around us.

“Another act of goodness and kindness, another act of light, can make all the difference,” he said.

Schusterman noted that Harford Chabad's menorahs are one of more than 15,000 public menorahs sponsored by Chabad in more than 100 countries around the world. To find a local event in Maryland, go to HarfordChabad.org/HanukkahEvents.

Advertisement

Harford Chabad offers Jewish education, outreach and social service programs for families and individuals. For more information, contact Schusterman at 443-353-9718, Rabbi@HarfordChabad.org or at HarfordChabad.org.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement