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Resident: The lost art of communication

A recent experience with some in Bel Air brought to light a systemic problem that has become somewhat a common and far too often acceptable practice in business and public communications. There was once a time when an inquiry, regardless of its purpose, would be answered in kind with at least an acknowledgement by the recipient. This lost concept in the art of communication is what used to be known as professional courtesy.

Where has it gone? What is the underlying reason so many no longer acknowledge or return calls and emails soliciting contact, assistance or information? Perhaps it is the nature of today’s fast-paced digital workplace, over-tasked staff or perhaps it is not unlike the great swirling cauldron we know today as social media, where attention spans are generally shorter than the time it takes to make toast.

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I don’t have all the answers, but several decades of experience have taught me that it all starts at the top. Leadership is paramount in all aspects of business, most importantly in communication. Instilling good communication skills and protocols both internally and externally is a tried and true recipe for building a successful operation and professional reputation. Without it, you portray an air of disinterest and disconnect.

It is much easier to give a quick return call or email response just to let someone know you have received their message rather than ignore them and have to make excuses or address fallout later. I say we begin a new renaissance in business communications and return to the old tried and true method of professional courtesy, it really does go a long way in building trusting, mutually beneficial relationships.

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Lyle Garitty

Joppatowne

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