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In Perryman, a blueprint for spoiling the natural world of Harford County | READER COMMENTARY

In the dead of summer, when I pull into my driveway, on Perryman Road, the temperature drops a minimum of 5 to 8 degrees. The trees are shading mostly grass and plants; there is not much in the way of tar, concrete or steel. The house is shaded enough that solar panels are not an option but that’s okay – there is only a seldom-used air conditioner unplugged under the open window. Small proof, I realize, that constant construction is damaging to the earth and air, but multiply that . . .

I have lived in Perryman for over 40 years, and this is just a snapshot of our tribulations endured for the “American Dream.”

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First, living on the Bush River with my family, where we all swam, fished, boated, and even ice skated a few times. Now, living on Perryman Road with my husband, we made the choice to recycle and reuse the existing structure. Though at times it was a bit rough, we did have electric and water, that is until Clorox Co. built on – or at least to close to – wetlands and began its insatiable need for water. Then our well went dry.

Then pipelines changed creek beds and water flow, creating swamps for raising mosquitoes and preventing use of the outdoors unless coated with bug sprays. Add the trucks parking on road shoulders with engines running. You don’t want to go out with the noise and fumes, but you have to, to pick up the endless streams of trash left on the property. That from just one warehouse/plant.

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To have rezoned one side of a rural road light industrial and residential on the other appears to be the brainchild of political appointees and developers who live in another part of the county, where woods, homes and fields are protected. A fine example are the acres cleared for a car auction, moved from Bel Air to Route 7 (Philadelphia Road, one of our most historic highways), and covered with tar, concrete and steel. Lets check the numbers for that global warming disaster.

Also consider the millions of dollars spent on repetitive studies of the Chesapeake Bay and, instead, use the money to buy up lands like the Mitchell Property in Perryman as protection – like the farms in other parts of the county. Only this is surrounding a river that leads to the bay, the most important part of Maryland.

Could it be overpopulation, corporate greed, and more typical lip service from politicians that explains this gross misuse of land? Talk about the future for your children’s children and look into the clearing of our land and its effects on climate change. I think you will be surprised.

Jacqueline Walker, Perryman

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