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Letter: Abingdon, Edgewood residents should appeal assessments, as planned warehouses will hurt home values | READER COMMENTARY

On Dec. 30 many Abingdon and Edgewood residents received their assessment notices. These assessments supposedly are in line with the 8.1% increase is assessments statewide. However, the state has failed to take into account the impending construction of the Abingdon Business Park right in the center of Abingdon and Edgewood residential areas. The property upon which the ABP is to be built consists of 326 acres running from the intersection of Edgewood and Van Bibber Roads to Abingdon Road.

This proposed massive project consists of 2.4 million square feet of warehouse space even though there are numerous vacant warehouses in the area already. In addition to the warehouses it will also include 97,400 square feet of commercial, retail and food service businesses.

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Much of the property is designated non-tidal wetlands and there is a 100-year flood plain. The HaHa Branch and underground streams on the property feed into the Bush River which feeds into the Chesapeake Bay. The development of this property under the ABP proposal will result in the loss of over 300 acres of trees and will do irreparable damage to the environment.

There can be doubt that the Abingdon Business Park will also cause residential values in its vicinity to plummet. There will be additional traffic along the already congested Routes 7, 24, 924, and Abingdon Road. Tractor-trailers will be spewing carcinogenic diesel particulates and fumes 24/7 impacting the health of area residents and the students attending the adjoining William Paca/Old Post Road Elementary Schools.

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I urge all area residents in the vicinity of the proposed Abingdon Business Park to appeal their assessments because the ABP will most certainly de-value their properties. Perhaps if thousands residents in its immediate vicinity successfully appeal their assessments the Harford County government will realize the project should no longer be supported. Even if the appeals are denied it will send a message to the local government that when the citizens vehemently oppose something they will not accept it submissively. Corporate greed and government compliance should not far outweigh public concerns and environmental health.

MARYLEE A. STRITCH

Abingdon

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