xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Letter: Glad to see Cecil embracing trauma-informed care approach

Thank you for carrying Phil Davis’ detailed description of new trauma-informed health care and law enforcement services in Cecil County ("Orphaned kids drive one of county’s overhaul of opioid trauma services'). The significance of Cecil County’s new, evidence-based approach to treatment also was confirmed by The Baltimore Sun’s front page placement of Mr. Davis’ reporting.

As someone who has worked and volunteered with substance use disorder prevention, treatment and recovery services, it was personally and professionally gratifying to me to learn about how Cecil County’s social services, emergency services and health departments have embraced what is a growing, national trend to address trauma with their clients and the clients’ families.

Advertisement

In our sister state to the north, Gov. John Carney signed an executive order making Delaware “a trauma-informed state,” making training for social services, law enforcement (including corrections), and community partner agencies to get up-to-date training on incorporating trauma-informed awareness, sensitivity, responsiveness and care into their respective agencies.

Treating substance use disorder (addiction) is not a simple quick-fix. Understanding and updating drug prevention, treatment and recovery programs to include the research findings such as adverse childhood experiences (ACES) and trauma-informed principles is becoming more widespread by policymakers, health care providers, and community organizations. Those who have not adopted this new knowledge should consider doing so.

Advertisement
Advertisement

DON MATHIS

Havre de Grace

The author serves on the board of Doctors for America.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement