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Special needs Boy Scout Troop 4513 helps make Little Free Library for Shucks Road park

Special needs Boy Scout Troop 4513 helps make Little Free Library for Shucks Road park
Members of Boy Scout Troop 4513 - standing from left, Patrick Hagan, Glenn Myers, Michael Wilson, Aaron Slaysman, Jason Weiderhold and Chris Fendick; seated from left, Todd Charpie and Nate Leuschner; and Thomas Joesten, not pictured - helped build, paint and install a little free library at Shuck Road Regional Park. (Courtesy Kathy Fendick / Baltimore Sun)

Members of Boy Scout Troop 4513 of Churchville built and erected a Little Free Library at Schucks Regional Park on June 6.

Troop 4513, led by Scoutmaster Gary Nasuta, is a special needs scout troop. Its members include Patrick Hagan, Glenn Myers, Michael Wilson, Aaron Slaysman, Jason Weiderhold, Chris Fendick, Todd Charpie, Nate Leuschner and Thomas Joesten.

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The Scouts helped with building, painting and installing the library at the park. They also donated books to put into it.

The library is along the Sensory Trail, a 1/10-mile trail next to the park’s main parking lot that includes 10 interactive features.

Assistant Scoutmaster Rusty Fendick had seen little free libraries through his travels across the country and suggested the idea for the library as a good Scout service project to help the community.

Fendick also thought about his mother when doing the project. Adeline Fendick was a school librarian and teacher.

He also thought the Shucks Road library would be a good tribute to the creator of the Little Free Library concept, Todd H. Bol , who died Oct. 18, 2018.

In 2009, Bol created the first Little Free Library book exchange and put it in his Hudson, Wisc., front yard in tribute to his mother, who had been a teacher.

Children and adults of all ages and backgrounds can share in the give and take of the free library. Troop members encourage Harford residents to visit their local “Little Free Library” and “take a book, leave a book.”

Among the features on the trail are 9-foot chimes for two octaves of solo or group music; a roller table for pinch-free tactile sliding; drums and xylophones of different sizes; and brightly colored panels at kid-eye level for lots of fun and sensory stimulation.

“We have over 2,700 children with disabilities in Harford County, so for us it means a chance for them, with their peers, to experience nature have sensory stimulation which we know is good for all kids, interact with their peers and just have a safe place to play here in Harford County,” Rachel Harbin, manager of the Harford Office of Disability Services, said at the trail opening.

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