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University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health President Lyle Sheldon to retire

University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health President/CEO Lyle E. Sheldon adds his signature to the large steel beam during the topping off ceremony Thursday June 24, 2021 at Leidos Field at Ripken Stadium to celebrate the vertical construction progress on the new Aberdeen medical campus site.
University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health President/CEO Lyle E. Sheldon adds his signature to the large steel beam during the topping off ceremony Thursday June 24, 2021 at Leidos Field at Ripken Stadium to celebrate the vertical construction progress on the new Aberdeen medical campus site. (Matt Button / The Aegis/Baltimore Sun Media)

University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health President and CEO Lyle E. Sheldon will retire in December after more than two decades as the leader of the Harford County health care system.

Sheldon worked for Upper Chesapeake Health for 34 years, 26 of which he spent as its executive head. Throughout his career, he spearheaded new initiatives including overseeing the 2000 opening of the system’s namesake medical center in Bel Air as a replacement for Fallston General Hospital, and the 2013 merger with the University of Maryland Medical System which increased health care accessibility and led to the creation of the Patricia D. and M. Scot Kaufman Cancer Center, according to a news release.

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During his time as the head of Upper Chesapeake Health, Sheldon expanded specialty health care programs and focused on making health care services accessible, according to the release.

He also oversaw the creation in 2019 of the Klein Family Harford Crisis Center in Bel Air which partnered with local government to provide mental health and addiction services, according to the release.

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Sheldon also helped raise $17.3 million in a recent campaign to improve technology at Upper Chesapeake Health centers, expand programs and improve mental health services, according to the release.

“Servant leader is the best way to describe my leadership style,” Sheldon said in a news release. “This entire team are experts in their respective fields, and their talent and dedication has allowed such tremendous growth over the years. Who could ask for more? I am proud and humbled that, together, we were able to accomplish so much for our community.”

Under his leadership, Upper Chesapeake Health also developed a new medical campus in Aberdeen to replace the Harford Memorial Hospital and expand services in northeast Maryland. The new campus is currently under construction.

The 175,000 square-foot Aberdeen campus plans to boast a 24-hour emergency department with a helipad as well as behavioral health services, primary care and specialty care offices and testing and diagnostic services.

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“Lyle’s legacy will not be bricks and mortar; it will be his selfless and enthusiastic devotion to people,” said Mohan Suntha, president and chief executive officer of the University of Maryland Medical System in a news release. “Lyle has been a devoted advocate for the needs in his community and his limitless energy could be seen among Harford County leaders, state officials in Annapolis and among his colleagues at the System, right up to the UMMS boardroom. I congratulate Lyle on his retirement and thank him for his exceptional service during a long and very distinguished career.”

“Lyle Sheldon is a community-minded man of faith who truly wants the best for his family, friends and neighbors,” said Bryan Kelly, University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health board chair. “He has dedicated his career to improving the health of his community in a very real and impactful way. I am grateful to him for his service and his friendship.”

The University of Maryland Medical System and the University of Maryland Upper Chesapeake Health board of directors will now start the selection process for a new president and CEO, according to the release.

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