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Advanced Granite shooter Radee Prince to serve 5 life sentences for shooting co-workers, killing 3

Enoc Sosa remembers Oct. 18, 2017, as the most tragic day of his life, one that still effects him to this day. That was the day Sosa, and four others who worked at Advanced Granite Solutions in Edgewood, were shot by co-worker Radee Labeeb Prince.

Prince, 41, was sentenced Friday in Harford County Circuit Court to serve five life sentences for the shooting, which claimed three lives and injured two others, including Sosa.

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Sosa was struck in the head with a bullet, which left him with scars, brain damage, cognitive issues and post-traumatic stress disorder, according to his victim impact statement, which prosecutors read at Friday’s hearing. The shooting, has changed him — even his kids notice the difference.

“They can tell I am not the same dad as before,” Harford County Assistant State’s Attorney Angela Diehl read.

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Harford County Judge Yolanda Curtin sentenced Prince to serve three life sentences without parole, the maximum sentence in Maryland, for three counts of first-degree murder. The two additional life sentences were handed down in relation to two attempted first-degree murder charges for the shooting victims who survived. The life sentences are to be served consecutively.

Curtin also handed down 20- and 15-year sentences for two firearms violations related to the workplace mass shooting, to be served concurrently.

Radee Prince was found guilty of killing three people and injuring two others in a shooting at Advanced Granite Solutions in Edgewood in October 2017. On Friday, he was given five life sentences for the shootings.
Radee Prince was found guilty of killing three people and injuring two others in a shooting at Advanced Granite Solutions in Edgewood in October 2017. On Friday, he was given five life sentences for the shootings. (Courtesy Harford Sheriff's Offic / BSMG)

A Harford County jury found Prince guilty of the charges on Oct. 28, but because Prince pleaded not criminally responsible — Maryland’s version of the insanity defense — the jury then needed to determine whether he could appreciate the criminality of his actions or if he could not conform his behavior to the law at the time of the offense because of mental illness. The jury found him criminally responsible a few days later, on Nov. 2.

Prince killed Bayarsaikhan Tudev, 53, of Virginia; Jose Hidalgo Romero, 34, of Aberdeen; and Enis Mrvoljak, 48, of Dundalk, in the Advanced Granite shooting. Jose Roberto Flores Guillen of Edgewood and Sosa, of North East, were injured in the attack.

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Before Prince begins serving his sentences in Maryland, he must first finish a 40-year sentence in Delaware on an attempted manslaughter charge there. Prince was found guilty in Delaware for shooting Rashan “Jason” Baul in the face after leaving the Advanced Granite shooting and driving to Wilmington to confront him.

After the sentencing hearing Friday, Deputy District Public Defender John Janowich said that his agency would pursue “any and all post-trial remedies” for Prince.

”It was challenging from beginning to end, and we are not done yet,” he said.

Prince’s sentencing, like the trial that preceded it, was heated. At trial, Prince had exchanged barbs with assistant state’s attorney Timothy Doory, and at sentencing Friday, he maintained accusations that Doory had misled the jury and railroaded him and other defendants.

Prince alleged a series of legal and procedural issues with his case, decrying Judge Curtin as biased and the criminal justice system in Harford County as rigged. Curtin listened to the lengthy statement for many minutes before stopping him.

“I do not expect this biased judge to give me anything but the maximum,” Prince said. “Harford County’s system is broken.”

Curtin said his statement seemed to be arguing for a new trial, a request for which she had already denied.

“This is enough,” she said. “You have attorneys who can argue on your behalf.”

But Prince continued speaking over the judge’s repeated admonitions. Curtin said that he was not helping himself, but he continued reading even as she called a temporary recess. As the two raised their voices and spoke over each other, deputies huddled closer around Prince.

When court reconvened, Curtin rejected the argument that Prince was suffering from a mental illness, saying that there was evidence that he had been a violent person all his life. She said the crime was unconscionable, and that the sentence was for the protection of the community.

“This court finds the defendant is beyond any rehabilitative measures,” Curtin said when meting out the sentence.

During his statement, Prince said he plans to appeal the ruling.

At trial, Prince’s attorneys said that he suffered from mental illness and paranoia after a 2014 assault that put him in the hospital, and argued that Prince shot his co-workers because he feared for his life.

Prince testified that Baul, his former childhood friend, paid a group of people to assault him outside a nightclub, an experience that friends and family testified left him paranoid.

On Oct. 18, 2017, Prince said, he gathered his co-workers together to ask them to stop playing pranks on him when he saw a threatening gesture and he started shooting.

After the shooting at Advanced Granite Solutions, Prince drove to Delaware and shot Baul.

The prosecution argued that Prince was using mental illness as a smoke screen to avoid consequences. Travis Klein, a state psychiatrist, testified that in his opinion Prince did not suffer from major depression. He diagnosed Prince with anti-social personality disorder — which cannot be used as a legal defense — and PTSD.

In a statement, State’s Attorney Albert Peisinger praised the law enforcement agencies and prosecution team that secured the conviction.

“[Prince] deserved nothing less than the maximum penalty afforded by law for these vicious crimes,” Peisinger said. “Our thoughts are with the victims and their families, and we hope that today’s sentence brings some measure of comfort to them.”

At sentencing Friday, the defense brought forward friends, family members and a mitigation specialist who said Prince was mentally ill and raised to not seek help or consider treatment. His brother, Leondrei Prince apologized to all the families who were affected by the shooting, but said that his brother needed help. Prince was not taught to seek mental help in his upbringing because his mother and the community he lived in stigmatized treatment.

“It is hard being a Black man and dealing with mental health issues,” he said.

Prince’s sister, Rayya, said she was sorry for the victims’ families and that her brother needed mental health treatment. She said she would still support her brother.

“I just want to let him know that I love him,” she said in her brief address.

Victim impact statements were largely delivered by prosecutors Friday. Diehl relayed a statement from one of the survivors, Guillen, which stated he did not wish to be present for the sentencing because he is still angry and trying to understand why Prince shot up the workplace.

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Diehl said Guillen had requested the judge give Prince the maximum sentence possible.

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A family friend of Mrvoljak’s wife translated an impact statement for her and read it in court Friday. She said that Mrvoljak was always smiling, and the two had fled war in Bosnia to come to the U.S., seeking safety and a new life. She said she would not want anyone to experience what she has.

“We were ready to adjust to life in our new country,” she relayed. “Our dream did not come true.”

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