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Harford jury finds Advanced Granite shooter Radee Prince criminally responsible for murders of 3 co-workers

Harford County State's Attorney Albert Peisinger, Jr. announced Monday that a jury found Radee Prince Jr. criminally responsible for three counts of murder.

A Harford County jury determined Monday that Radee Labeeb Prince was in his right mind when he shot five of his co-workers — killing three — at Advanced Granite Solutions in October 2017.

Prince, 40, had been found guilty Wednesday of three counts of first-degree murder, two of attempted first-degree murder and two firearms violations for the Edgewood workplace mass shooting.

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However, because Prince pleaded not criminally responsible — Maryland’s version of the insanity defense — the jury then needed to determine whether he could appreciate the criminality of his actions or if he could not conform his behavior to the law at the time of the offense because of mental illness.

Radee Prince was found guilty of killing three people and injuring two others in a shooting at Advanced Granite Solutions in Edgewood in October 2017.
Radee Prince was found guilty of killing three people and injuring two others in a shooting at Advanced Granite Solutions in Edgewood in October 2017. (Courtesy Harford Sheriff's Offic / BSMG)

Prince killed Bayarsaikhan Tudev, 53, of Virginia; Jose Hidalgo Romero, 34, of Aberdeen; and Enis Mrvoljak, 48, of Dundalk, in the shooting. Jose Roberto Flores Guillen of Edgewood and Enoc Sosa of North East were injured in the attack.

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The 12-person jury, composed of nine women and three men, returned the verdict on Prince’s criminal responsibility around 11:30 a.m. Monday.

“These acts of senseless violence have scarred this community forever,” Harford County State’s Attorney Albert Peisinger said in a statement. “My heart goes out to the victims and their families and I hope this verdict will be the first step in closing this tragic chapter.”

At a news conference later Monday, Peisinger praised the three prosecutors — Cyndi Adkins, Angela Diehl and Timothy Doory — who brought the case home, but noted the successful prosecution cannot bring back those who died or undo the damage to those who lived.

Defense attorney John Janowich expressed disappointment with both verdicts. “Right now, our focus is the sentencing phase,” he said.

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Sentencing for Prince has not yet been scheduled.

Prince could face up to a life sentence without parole for each of the three counts of first-degree murder and two counts of attempted first-degree murder, plus up to 25 additional years in prison for the remaining charges, according to Peisinger’s statement.

Standing outside the Harford County Circuit Courthouse Monday Harford County State's Attorney Albert Peisinger, Jr. front, flanked by prosecuters , from left, Angela Diehl, Cyndi Adkins and Timothy Doory, announces that Radee Prince, Jr. was found guilty of first degree murder as well as other related firearms offenses in the workplace shooting at Advanced Granite Solutions in Edgewood on October 18, 2017.
Standing outside the Harford County Circuit Courthouse Monday Harford County State's Attorney Albert Peisinger, Jr. front, flanked by prosecuters , from left, Angela Diehl, Cyndi Adkins and Timothy Doory, announces that Radee Prince, Jr. was found guilty of first degree murder as well as other related firearms offenses in the workplace shooting at Advanced Granite Solutions in Edgewood on October 18, 2017. (Matt Button / The Aegis)

However, Prince will first serve a sentence in Delaware before returning to Maryland for whatever sentence Judge Yolanda Curtin imposes, Peisinger said.

Prince was sentenced to 40 years in a Delaware state prison after being found guilty of attempted manslaughter there for shooting of Rashan “Jason” Baul in the face after leaving the Advanced Granite Solutions shooting and driving to Wilmington to confront him.

Defense attorney Mary Pizzo said any decision to appeal the case will have to be made by Prince after his sentencing.

Juror Shirley McAlexander said the most compelling piece of evidence she saw was the video of the shooting.

She said deliberations took a while because some of the jurors believed that Prince was not in his right mind when he shot his co-workers. A few jurors were unsure Friday, when the jury deliberated for nearly seven hours, but coming back Monday, only one person had doubts about Prince’s criminal responsibility, McAlexander said.

After approximately two hours of deliberation Monday, that juror was swayed, she said.

“We all took it seriously,” said McAlexander, who was serving on a jury for the first time.

Weighing the experts' testimonies was fairly clear-cut, McAlexander said; she believed the state’s expert Travis Klein because of his credentials as a forensic psychiatrist. The fact that David Williamson, a forensic psychiatrist, was hired by Prince’s defense attorneys did not enter into her assessment of his credibility, she said.

Throughout the trial, Prince’s attorneys said that he suffered from mental illness and paranoia after a 2014 assault that put him in the hospital, and argued that Prince shot his co-workers Oct. 18, 2017, because he feared for his life.

Prince testified that Baul, his former childhood friend, paid a group of people to assault him outside a nightclub, an experience that friends and family testified left him paranoid. On the day in question, Prince said, he gathered his co-workers together to ask them to stop playing pranks on him when he saw a threatening gesture and he started shooting.

After the shooting at Advanced Granite Solutions, Prince drove to Delaware and shot Baul.

The defense called Williamson to testify to Prince’s mental state; he diagnosed the defendant with major depression with psychotic features, post-traumatic stress disorder and a mild brain injury resulting from the 2014 assault. Williamson did not, however, speak to Prince’s responsibility.

The prosecution argued that Prince was using mental illness as a smoke screen to avoid consequences. Klein, a state psychiatrist, testified that in his opinion Prince did not suffer from major depression. He diagnosed Prince with anti-social personality disorder — which cannot be used as a legal defense — and PTSD.

Klein testified in both the guilt and criminal responsibility portions of the trial. He evaluated Prince as part of a court order and testified that Prince appreciated the criminality of his conduct and could conform his behavior to the law — two key factors in determining criminal responsibility.

Klein also testified that Prince denied suffering from a mental illness while he was in jail.

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