xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Aberdeen Post Office celebrates ‘Customer Appreciation Day’

Aberdeen Postmaster Priscilla Burrell gives a cupcake to 9-year-old Lucia Gionfriddo, of West Chester, Pennsylvania as Lucia and her mother visited the Aberdeen post office Saturday during the U.S. Postal Service's 'Customer Appreciation Day.'
Aberdeen Postmaster Priscilla Burrell gives a cupcake to 9-year-old Lucia Gionfriddo, of West Chester, Pennsylvania as Lucia and her mother visited the Aberdeen post office Saturday during the U.S. Postal Service's 'Customer Appreciation Day.' (David Anderson/The Aegis / Baltimore Sun Media Group)

Amanda Gionfriddo was all set to pay her local school taxes online, but the West Chester, Pennsylvania resident realized during her travels to Aberdeen — to watch her son play in a youth baseball tournament — that she left the papers to do so on her desk at work.

So, she made an unscheduled stop at the Aberdeen post office downtown Saturday afternoon, filled out a check, put it in an envelope and mailed it. Gionfriddo and her 9-year-old daughter, Lucia, happened to be at the West Bel Air Avenue facility on the same day area post offices were celebrating “Customer Appreciation Day.”

Advertisement

“I figured I’d just hit a post office down here,” Gionfriddo said as she hurried to write the check and mail it. She wanted to get to the Ripken Stadium complex in time to catch her 13-year-old son Rian and his travel team, the Chester County Rebels, playing in the 14-and-under league tournament.

Priscilla Burrell, the Aberdeen postmaster, stood near a small table in the customer service area and greeted people as they came in to send packages and mail. The table was decorated with balloons, napkins, paper plates and held a serving dish of cupcakes as well as bottles of water and postal-themed activity books for children.

Advertisement
Advertisement
A table in the Aberdeen post office is decorated with cupcakes, balloons and children's activity books Saturday as the post office and other U.S. Postal Service facilities in the Baltimore area hosted a 'Customer Appreciation Day.'
A table in the Aberdeen post office is decorated with cupcakes, balloons and children's activity books Saturday as the post office and other U.S. Postal Service facilities in the Baltimore area hosted a 'Customer Appreciation Day.' (David Anderson/The Aegis / Baltimore Sun Media Group)

The day was meant to thank customers “for still using us as a postal service,” Burrell said. Aberdeen was one of three post offices in the Baltimore area — along with the Middle River post office in Baltimore County and the Raspeburg post office in Baltimore — that celebrated their customers as well as the recent release of the U.S. Postal Service’s Tyrannosaurus Rex “Forever” stamps.

Visitors could also obtain T-Rex-themed pictorial postmarks that honor the new stamp and are available to customers for free through Oct. 1. Customers can get the postmark when sending a postcard or mail in an envelope that is addressed and has postage affixed, according to a news release from the USPS.

Customers can also get the T-Rex postmark when they send a stamped envelope or postcard — without an address — in a larger envelope, for cancellation.

“The events are an opportunity to show our customers how much we appreciate their business, answer their questions, and to celebrate very special pictorial postmarks specific to each community’s post office,” Baltimore District Manager Darryl Martin said in a statement.

Advertisement

Three area children designed the T-Rex pictorial postmarks, according to the news release. Aurora Lutz, of Aberdeen, was recognized for her design Saturday at the Aberdeen post office customer appreciation, according to Burrell.

Gionfriddo, the Pennsylvania resident, appreciated that the Aberdeen post office remained open after noon on Saturday, noting many other post offices close earlier. The Aberdeen office is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturdays; it is closed Sundays, according to the USPS website.

This photo provided by the U.S. Postal Service shows the Tyrannosaurus Rex Forever Stamps. The Postal Service said that the commemorative Forever stamps were issued Aug. 29, 2019. (U.S. Postal Service via AP)
This photo provided by the U.S. Postal Service shows the Tyrannosaurus Rex Forever Stamps. The Postal Service said that the commemorative Forever stamps were issued Aug. 29, 2019. (U.S. Postal Service via AP) (AP)

She said she conducts much of her correspondence and bill paying online, but uses her local post office to buy stamps.

“I do a lot online, but you still need to get the stamps for [mailing] the taxes,” Gionfriddo said.

She said she often gets Christmas-themed stamps or stamps bearing the Purple Heart military decoration, which honors troops killed or wounded in action.

The Aberdeen post office remained busy Saturday; its workforce of about 30 people serves 75 to 100 customers per day, according to Burrell. Customers often come in for U.S. passport services, to purchase money orders or send mail and packages.

Many customers had been sending packages of school clothing and supplies during the past week, said Burrell, who helped one woman at the customer service desk fit her items into their packaging envelope.

The Postal Service also provides regular package delivery service, including deliveries of products purchased online via Amazon on Sundays, according to Burrell.

“It’s great to know that we’re still needed,” she said.

Customer Debbie Gullion, of Aberdeen, said she uses postal services on a regular basis. Gullion, who is a retired child support enforcement agent for the state, said she purchases money orders, buys stamps, sends packages, even handwritten letters to family and friends.

“I do everything here,” she said outside the Aberdeen post office.

Gullion said she uses email for business-related communications or text messages for quick communications with her children, but she also writes letters by hand because “I think they should be personal.”

“You actually have to take the time to sit down and think about what you want to write, and then write and mail it,” she said.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement