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Lane closures planned on Route 40 Hatem Bridge between Harford and Cecil counties for roadwork starting Oct. 19

Tolls on the Hatem Bridge, connecting Harford and Cecil counties over the Susquehanna River, are slated to go cashless.
Tolls on the Hatem Bridge, connecting Harford and Cecil counties over the Susquehanna River, are slated to go cashless.

One eastbound lane of the Thomas J. Hatem Memorial Bridge on Route 40 between Harford and Cecil counties will be closed starting next week, along with additional closures planned in the coming weeks.

The eastbound closures will take place on weekdays between 7 a.m. and 3 p.m. starting Monday, Oct. 19 and continuing through Nov. 20. Some overnight lane closures may take place between 9 p.m. and 5 a.m., according to a Maryland Transportation Authority news release.

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Additionally, one westbound lane will be closed continuously from Oct. 26 to Nov. 9, and westbound Route 40 will be temporarily closed at Route 222 for three consecutive weekends starting Oct. 30. During that time, the road will close at 9 p.m. on Fridays and reopen at 5 a.m. on Mondays through Nov. 23.

Motorists will be detoured to northbound Route 222 to southbound I-95, then to southbound Route 155 at exit 89 to westbound Route 40. There is no toll at the southbound I-95, the MDTA notes.

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Eastbound Route 40 traffic will be shifted onto westbound Route 40 at the Ohio and Ostego street intersection and back onto eastbound Route 40 at the Route 222 intersection.

The closures are part of the MDTA’s project to reconstruct the existing pavement from the E Street Bridge approach to Route 222 in Cecil County, to remove the existing toll plaza and to construct a new toll gantry and Information Technology System equipment to support all-electronic tolling operations west of the Hatem Bridge.

Maryland debuted fully cashless tolling at the Hatem and Francis Scott Key bridges last fall. Then, officials temporarily made all of the state’s tolls all-electronic in March as part of the COVID-19 response. The new system aims to reduce engine idling for better fuel efficiency and reduced emissions, decrease congestion and increase safety, according to the MDTA.

Drivers now pay tolls either by E-ZPass or by video tolls, which take a picture of the vehicle’s license plate and send a bill by mail to the driver’s address.

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