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Blood drive to honor fallen Harford County deputies on four-year anniversary of their deaths

Mark Logsdon’s young granddaughter gamboled through the halls of the Harford County Sheriff’s Office on Thursday with a badge like the one her grandfather wore pinned to her pink shirt.

Though inquisitive and happy, with her great-grandparents in tow, she was in the office for a somber occasion: her grandfather’s memorial.

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The Harford County Sheriff’s Office and American Red Cross are hosting a blood drive on Monday, Feb. 10, in honor of two deputies who were killed pursuing a wanted person in 2016. The blood drive will mark the four-year anniversary of both deputies’ deaths.

The blood drive will be hosted at the Joppa Magnolia Volunteer Fire — one of the agencies that worked to save their lives — on 1401 Old Mountain Road in Joppa from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

As of Thursday, over 70 people had signed up to donate blood. Those interested can call the American Red Cross at 1-800-733-2767 to schedule a donation.

The two deputies, Senior Deputy Patrick Dailey and Deputy First Class Mark Logsdon, were shot and killed in pursuit of David Brian Evans on Feb. 10, 2016.

Dailey was called to a report of a wanted person at Panera Bread in Abingdon, where he found Evans seated alone at a table. While they spoke, Evans suddenly produced a handgun and shot Dailey in the head, according to the sheriff’s office.

Evans ran, and Logsdon, who had been eating lunch nearby, was one of the responding deputies who found him in a car parked at the Park View Apartments, a senior living complex.

Logsdon tried to make contact with Evans, but he was shot. Though wounded, Logsdon and other deputies fired back, killing Evans. Logsdon succumbed to his wounds after the firefight.

Logsdon’s parents, Debbie and Pat, said they wanted to see good come of the tragedy. Debbie Logsdon pushed for the blood drive. When her son was in the hospital, doctors administered blood transfusions, but “as fast as they put it in, it went out,” she said.

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For that fact, she felt a blood drive was appropriate to honor the two fallen officers while also helping others. Debbie Logsdon hopes regular donors will give blood on Monday, but she also wants the drive to be someone’s first time, so they can remember how their blood was given in memorial to the fallen deputies.

In the wake of the deputies’ deaths, Logsdon’s parents said the response from the community and the sheriff’s office was “unbelievable.” Their son’s funeral procession stretched for miles, and all manner of people gathered around them for support. Still, Pat Logsdon said, the hurt of losing a loved one does not fully go away.

“You have memorials for different things,” he said. But when you lose a son like he did, “you live through it every day.”

In honor of the deputies, County Executive Barry Glassman ordered the Harford County flag to be flown at half staff from sunrise Friday until sunset on Monday. The county also asked volunteer fire companies across the county to sound their sirens at noon on Monday to begin a countywide moment of silence.

County employees — whose administrative offices are illuminated with blue lights as a memorial — will gather for a moment of silence outside the county’s offices at 220 Main St. in Bel Air for anyone who wishes to attend.

“On this tragic anniversary, we continue to remember our fallen heroes, their families, and all those who risk their lives to protect our community,” Glassman said in a statement.

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Dailey had served 30 years with the sheriff’s office, and Logsdon had been with them for 16. Both served in the military prior to joining the department.

Seven Harford County Sheriff’s deputies have died in the line of duty since its formation more than 200 years ago, spokesperson Cristie Hopkins said.

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