xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Lax stars highlight latest Carroll County Hall of Fame class

The Carroll County Sports Hall of Fame has only one member primarily associated with lacrosse, but that's about to change.

This year's class includes two former standout girls lacrosse players, both of whom went on to excel at the college and international level.

Advertisement

Katie (Chrest) Erbe and Amber (Falcone) McKenzie are the hall's latest lacrosse inductees, and they'll be joined by Warren Bell, Bryan Harman, Kaye Kolb, and Troy Warehime when the Rotary Club of Westminster enshrines its newest class May 8 at Carroll Community College.

Erbe, a Hampstead native who attended Maryvale Prep, played four years of women's lacrosse at Duke University (Class of 2006) and was a two-time Atlantic Coast Conference Player of the Year. Erbe earned three All-America awards and helped Duke to its first ACC championship in 2005. At the end of that season, Erbet received the Tewaaraton Trophy, which is college lacrosse's equivalent to the Heisman Trophy for college football. Chrest graduated as the Blue Devils' all-time leading scorer, and went on to play for the U.S. Women's National Team that competed in the World Cup in 2009.

Advertisement

Erbe was a national teammate of McKenzie, who came from Winters Mill High School where she earned Times Girls Lacrosse Player of the Year honors in 2005. She played college lacrosse at North Carolina, switched to defense, and guided the Tar Heels to a national title game appearance in 2009.

McKenzie also became a force on the US women's team, and she won World Cup gold medals in 2009 and 2013. In 2009, McKenzie was named the Cup's Most Outstanding Defender along with being named to the All-World Team. She collected 18 ground balls and caused seven turnovers for Team USA.

Bell, a 1989 South Carroll graduate, excelled in basketball, football, and track and field. He held the school record in the 100-meter dash (10.8 seconds) and won county titles in several sprint events. In basketball, Bell helped the Cavaliers win a county title in 1989 and play in the Class 3A state final at the University of Maryland's Cole Field House. The previous fall, Bell led SC to a Central Maryland Conference crown and played offense and defense for the Cavs.

Harman, a lifelong Carroll resident, played football, baseball, and basketball at Westminster and earned all-state honors at quarterback. Harman led the Owls to the Class A state finals in 1976 and received honorable mention All-American status by Adidas and Joe Namath publications. He played three years of baseball at Westminster as well, helping the Owls win Tri-State League titles from 1975-77.

Harman played collegiately at James Madison and Towson, where he focused on baseball and moved onto a career as an educator and coach. He was Liberty's varsity coach from 1983-1994 (the Lions reached the state semifinals in 1985), then returned to his alma mater and took over as Westminster's varsity coach in 2002. Harman spent 10 years at the helm, and he helped the Owls win a 3A state crown in 2007 and a 4A state in 2011. Westminster capped an undefeated season with the 4A championship in 2011.

Kolb is credited with coming up with the idea to put high school basketball games on the radio in Carroll County. Kolb began broadcasting games for WTTR in 1959.

Warehime, a 1983 North Carroll grad and the school's current athletic director, played soccer and basketball for the Panthers and starred in both sports. He was the top goalie in Carroll County in 1982 and totaled 140 saves for NC before earning all-Monocacy Valley Athletic League honorable mention.

Warehime averaged 16.5 points per game in 1982, third best in the county, and raised his average to 16.9 in his senior season (second highest). Warehime finished with 785 career points and earned Times first-team all-county honors in both seasons.

Reach staff writer Pat Stoetzer at 410-857-7894 or pat.stoetzer@carrollcountytimes.com.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement