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Sykesville’s Alex Khan, Calvert Hall standout, drawing MLB Draft interest as third baseman

Calvert Hall third baseman Alex Khan has drawn interest from a number of scouts for this year's MLB Draft.
Calvert Hall third baseman Alex Khan has drawn interest from a number of scouts for this year's MLB Draft. (Vasilios Nikolaou)

Standing at 6 feet, 3 inches, and weighing 195 pounds, Calvert Hall third baseman Alex Khan certainly looks the part of a professional player.

Khan, a West Virginia baseball commit, has drawn the interest of professional baseball scouts during his performances during summer ball. In his sophomore year, Khan compiled a batting average of .311 with 12 doubles and 30 RBIs. This season, he’s hit .334 with a home run, 10 doubles and 29 RBIs.

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“It’s crazy. When you’re growing up as a kid and watching baseball on TV, you’re like, ‘I hope that can be me one day,’” Khan said. “It’s a dream and this summer, it became a reality. I remember when I first started talking to scouts, it was something I had to process. I had to talk to my family about it. This is a reality, this is actually happening and this is something that could happen down the road or in a few months. It’s just crazy. I’m taking it day by day.”

The senior third baseman grew up playing recreational baseball in the Sykesville/Eldersburg area. He branched out to travel baseball for the Western Howard County Renegades when he turned 10. Khan was discovered at a Calvert Hall baseball camp at 11, thus developing a relationship he still holds with the program.

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Although Khan grew up in the Baltimore region surrounded by a ton of Orioles fans, he’s a Yankees fan due to his father being from New York. There’s one Yankees player whose game he attempts to emulate and that’s infielder DJ LeMahieu.

LeMahieu plays third base, second base, and first base and standing at 6-4, LeMahieu is a taller player at the hot corner. Due to Khan’s size and ability at the plate to hit for average and power, he aspires to be like LeMahieu.

Calvert Hall coach Lou Eckerl has seen Khan improve as a leader over the years. Whether it’s rallying his teammates to be prepared for games and following his direction and competing as hard as they can, Khan’s leadership has proven indispensable for the Cardinals over the years.

Calvert Hall baserunner Alex Khan and Gilman catcher Michael Mallas look to the homeplate umpire for the call after the play at the plate during Monday night's MIAA A Conference championship game at the Harford Community College Sports Complex. Khan was called out on the play.
Calvert Hall baserunner Alex Khan and Gilman catcher Michael Mallas look to the homeplate umpire for the call after the play at the plate during Monday night's MIAA A Conference championship game at the Harford Community College Sports Complex. Khan was called out on the play. (Matt Button, Baltimore Sun Media Group)

One major point of improvement has been Khan’s consistency in the field. As a sophomore, Khan’s ability to field wasn’t nearly as sharp. Certain plays he struggled to make. Since then, Khan has worked on his fielding, making the routine plays look extremely easy and plays away from his glove side look even easier.

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“It’s a real pleasure. When you have special athletes like Alex, you can do a lot more when you don’t have guys like him,” Eckerl said. “They add a great dimension to the team by bringing everyone else’s play up to their level. So, everyone is challenged by him and try to mimic and do the same things that he does and it makes everyone better on the team. Watching him develop and not make the same mistakes that he did before — especially in the field of play — he hardly makes any errors anymore.”

Khan’s older brother, Sami, was a Calvert Hall standout as well. As an outfielder, Sami Khan plays his college ball at WVU Potomac State. The two brothers have bounced things off of one another and confide in each other to improve their games. The younger Khan said he’s grateful to have a brother that pushes him toward greatness.

“The biggest supporter and role model that I have, has to be my brother,” Alex Khan said. “He’s at Potomac State and he’s a freshman in college, but he’s always pushed me to be better. Even after I committed, it’s just been nonstop, ‘You’ve got to get better and you can’t get complacent because everyone else is working just as hard as you are.’ He’s staying on me and my parents of course are keeping me on track. Those are my biggest supporters.”

Calvert Hall has 14 players who’ve been selected in the MLB Amateur Draft since 1966. Only four players — Joe Gast (1985), Andy Bair (1995), Alex Murphy (2013) and Troy Stokes Jr. (2014) — have signed professional deals. Stokes Jr. is currently in the Pittsburgh Pirates organization as an outfielder.

Eckerl is hoping that Khan is next in line.

“We’re all rooting for him, that’s for sure,” Eckerl said. “As long as he keeps developing, he has a chance to [make it to the majors]. As long as he doesn’t stop right here. He’s going to West Virginia next year, so we expect great things while he’s there. If he keeps working hard and keeps developing, the sky’s the limit.”

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