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In this day and age, best not to get caught in a lie

I remember, growing up, a friend whose family had a pool had a sign that read, "We don't swim in your toilet. Please don't pee in our pool."

For some reason, that sign was the first thing that popped into my head upon hearing about Ryan Lochte's gas station shenanigans.

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Maybe Lochte's will be more than just the latest in a list of lessons about why we shouldn't lie. Maybe, the images of the evidence of what really happened, as captured a la TMZ on a Brazilian gas station's closed-circuit TV — as compared to, and/or as it totally discredited, Lochte's Proof of Life-styled fictitious story of a robbery that never was —will be the wake-up call for athletes, cheaters, kids, and anyone else who ...

Everyone has a camera these days! CBS' "Person of Interest" may personify the point by way of made-for-TV dramatic fiction, but it is art imitating life in the way that its fiction is heavily borrowed from some version of the reality that cameras are everywhere. TMZ (and whatever TMZ "Sports" is, as I don't think they broadcast any actual sporting events) does not exist but for men, women, celebrities, and athletes behaving badly within view of someone with a camera or a camera phone.

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One of the best pieces of advice I've ever received, as it relates to lying is that lying is exponentially harder to do than telling the truth: Once you tell a lie, you have to remember (to tell) that lie for the rest of your life.

As it pertains to Lochte's lie — if it hadn't come out now via grainy CCTV footage, it would've come out later, as he would likely have retold the story sometime in the future, perhaps at a party, in view of and/or on someone's camera phone.

Cameras are everywhere, and, if you're famous, they are, at least more or likely so, pointed at you — record buttons already pushed.

So — stop lying. It's hard. What's more, it's wrong. And, you're going to get caught.

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Sometimes, just about the time we think we may be good at something, or at least getting better at it, we come across something and/or someone who is engaged in the same activity, profession, pursuit, etc. whose abilities put our own in real perspective — often by dwarfing ours in comparison — reminding us to put any hint of ego in check and to get back to work getting better at our craft, whether it be a personal or professional pursuit, or something somewhere in between.

Last week, someone gave me a copy of a recent piece by Steve Rushin in Sports Illustrated where Rushin produced an entire piece playing on (or with) one word – sports. Rushin's piece playfully pondered a world without and/or wherein sports had never been born. It was creative, witty, and most of all, well-written in both style and substance in a way I (can only apparently) aspire to be. It was brilliant!

Again, as I write these on the fly, I may not take the time that I should to best develop and/or to better edit each week's offering(s). In this instance, well, I may not come up with the best witticism. But, in the vein of imitation (but not plagiarism) being the highest form of flattery, I thought I'd (try to) do for the idea of a world devoid of the camera-equipped phone what Rushin did for a world without sports — at least in truncated form.

Getting the obvious out of the way first: The only Kardashian the world would've ever known would be Robert, as there would've never been a sex tape to give birth to Kim's "career." And the ripple effects: The world may not have been witness, at least not by way of a literal made-for-TV transformation of Olympic gold medalist, Bruce to Caitlyn Jenner; and the adidas Yeezy Boost may, today, just sound like a made up, thrown together, leftover amalgamation of mid-90's slang.

"Selfie" would never have been added to the lexicon, let-alone the dictionary; and the sticks used for the taking of, and named therefor would never have been invented or evolved from their back scratcher brethren — and the world would be a better place.

Pokémon would have nowhere to go.

FaceTime wouldn't be around to drain your iPhone battery.

For "photo-bombing" see also "selfie" above.

Periscope(s) would still be reserved for the select few of the right rank serving on submarines.

Snap-stories and all the app's fun-filled filters ... well, again, see also "selfie."

Mark Zuckerberg would still have the $1 billion he used to buy Instagram, which would've never been born.

There would be no YouTube "stars" or Instagram/Tumblr "models" — and the world would be a better place.

Oenophiles and vintners would be the only ones overly concerned with their Vines. And even then, more so with the wines made from the grapes grown thereon, and not from the number of people who viewed those vines.

#nofilter would still/just refer to someone who lacks, whether intentionally or helplessly/haplessly so, the ability (or desire) to think before they speak.

And Ryan Lochte may have gotten away with his shenanigans and his lie. At least for now.

410-857-7896

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